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NateNate60 @lemmy.world
Posts 11
Comments 612
Many such cases
  • I think most of the complaints are that Microsoft Office doesn't work. Which is true. The web version of Microsoft Office is honestly kinda terrible.

    And no, people don't want to use a product that does the same thing as Microsoft Office, they want to use a product called "Microsoft Office". No, it's not logical, and doesn't make any sense at all but it's how people are.

  • Adobe-Alternatives: A list of alternatives for Adobe software.
  • No, of course people care. People who make a living using Photoshop and other Adobe products care, and in fact, that is the single most important thing they care about.

    What would be correct to say here is you don't care. And that's fair enough, but don't claim that you represent everyone's opinion.

  • Just asking questions. [more questions in body]
  • The answers to all these questions, for those curious:

    1. The unfinished pyramid symbolises that the United States is constantly changing and evolving.
    2. The Antarctic Treaty says that Antarctica isn't part of any country's sovereign territory. Countries can and do venture into Antarctica, and in fact, you can even do this yourself if you want. There are Antarctic bases all over Antarctica.
    3. There is no commercially popular commercial plane route that requires it, but there are people who have flown planes over Antarctica. The problem is just that there aren't any major population centres that far south. The equivalent is not true for the Arctic because there are a lot more big cities in the northern hemisphere.
    4. The footage isn't lost. You can view it on YouTube.
    5. They mounted the camera on the lunar module. The most popular picture of Apollo 11 is actually one of Buzz Aldrin. Armstrong is the one who took that picture.
    6. There's not much reason to. It's cool, sure, but there's not much interesting to see on the moon and it costs a lot to get there.
    7. Humans didn't evolve from monkeys. Humans and monkeys evolved from a common ancestor. That common ancestor is no longer around.
    8. "Garbage DNA" isn't "garbage". Most of it is just DNA that we haven't figured out the function of yet. Some DNA is actually unnecessary though. Those are telomeres. Since cellular reproduction involves copying DNA, and the process also involves some DNA at the end being lost, the extra unnecessary bit is needed to prevent the good parts from being lost.
    9. They wrote down on paper where they wanted bricks to go and then piled bricks in those spots. While people didn't exactly live in "wooden huts" (they lived in houses that looked like actual medieval houses, because they were), cathedrals and the Houses of Parliament are more extravagant because their owners had a lot more money to spend on their design and construction.
    10. (I could not determine the meaning of "pre-Luvian" architecture)
    11. They're not spaceships. They just look like spaceships. The Ancient Egyptians put out so much art that it's very likely that they eventu,ally would draw something that resembled a spaceship (or some other modern object).
    12. Most such findings have been fabrications, but those that were found were probably just really tall humans. Human height follows a normal distribution, and there have been tens of billions of humans alive, so eventually someone, by luck of the draw, will end up two and a half metres tall. Additionally, the idea of "really big person terrorising smaller people" isn't exactly super original or particularly hard to come up with.
    13. A search of early Christian art, which would have been made around the first century CE after Jesus's crucifixion, doesn't show any examples featuring mushrooms.
    14. (Missing)
    15. This is probably referring to the Tree of Life. It's not even shaped like a pine tree, mate. There are plenty of Old World plants with leaves like that.
    16. Dragons primarily appear in European cultures. Eastern cultures don't have the same dragons. We also call those creatures "dragons" as well but they really look nothing alike. Western dragons are like flying lizards, while Eastern dragons are more like snakes.
    17. Because people find it cool and will buy media with such imagery, particularly those who aren't religious.
    18. Because people find killing others as a gameplay mechanic fun.
  • North Dakotans Approve Age Limit for Members of Congress
  • I agree that the first-past-the-post voting system should be replaced with something better, but at the same time, complaining that people should participate more in primary elections is not a solution to the problem. A solution would be implement mandatory voting. That's not a popular solution (and you probably personally hate the idea), but it is a solution. I am not advocating for it.

    There's also just a sense of election fatigue. The US has a general election every other year which is far more often than most other countries.

    At the same time—

  • Adobe-Alternatives: A list of alternatives for Adobe software.
  • I've made my living from Photoshop for a very long time. I started using Photoshop with version 1.0.3. I use it in a professional context; I’ve worked on everything from annual reports to cruise ship catalogs to billboards to album covers in Photoshop.

    I pay for Photoshop because GIMP does, as of the last time I used it (which was admittedly about four years ago), perhaps 15% to 20% of what Photoshop does.

    A lot of people will tell you GIMP can do everything Photoshop does. These are people who do not know what Photoshop does.

    Photoshop is designed by a huge number of people with extreme technical knowledge in a wide range of diverse areas. People on the Photoshop team include experts in prepress, print reproduction, color theory, color calibration and profiling, and more. GIMP is…well, let’s be honest: it’s written by amateurs. They’re very talented, and for many people GIMP does just what they need. But it’s not Photoshop.

    —Franklin Veaux, author and graphic designer

  • North Dakotans Approve Age Limit for Members of Congress
  • Although I agree with this in principle, it ignores the reality of why officeholders get re-elected into their 70s and 80s. It's not because voters like them in particular, but it's because they are the "safe" option. They increasingly become nobody's first choice but there is often no logical alternative. Incumbents are also much more able to raise more campaign money than their opponents and thus have a large advantage just because they can blast their message more often.

  • Costco accused of “greedflation”: Wholesaler reports increase in earnings while hiking up prices
  • The hot dog being $1.50 is still good considering that they could probably double the price, which would triple or quadruple their profit on it and people would still happily buy.

    Of course, it's not because of altruism that they do it. They do it because people use the hot dog as a symbol of the good value for money that Costco supposedly provides.

  • Costco accused of “greedflation”: Wholesaler reports increase in earnings while hiking up prices
  • I was suspicious of this claim so I investigated the data from Costco's public statements for the 12-week period ending 18th February 2024.

    Revenue from merchandise sales was $57.33 bn while their cost was $51.14 bn. Selling and administrative costs (i.e. worker salaries, facilities, &c.) was $5.24 bn. The total costs add up to $56.38 bn, meaning their profit on merchandise sales was $0.95 bn, or 1.6%. This is unchanged compared to the 12-week period ending 18th February 2023 (last year).

    Based on the data, I find the claim that Costco is participating in greedflation questionable when their profit margin hasn't at all increased from last year.

    Rather, the growth on their bottom line appears attributable to (1) an increased volume in sales and (2) an increase in membership fees. Sales volume increased from $54.24 bn in 2023 to $57.33 in 2024. Hence the same 1.6% represents the same slice of a larger pie, resulting in greater profit in absolute terms. Additionally, revenue from membership fees increased from $1.02 bn to $1.11 bn (up 8.8%). Membership fees are basically 100% profit for Costco and it makes up most of their net revenue.

    Based on this data, I do not agree with the article's conclusion at all.

    The data is available here

    In the interest of disclosure: I own a very small amount of Costco stock (less than half a share).

  • 210 Palestinians reportedly killed during Israeli hostage recovery operation
  • I don't believe it is correct to call them "Palestinian" figures. There is no unified government in Palestine. There is a collection of multiple organisations exercising various amounts of authority over the Palestinian territories. The figures from the Gaza Health Ministry regarding civilian casualties are probably close to reality. But that doesn't mean anything else is accurate. I give credibility to the Gaza Health Ministry on the topic of civilian death counts and other related humanitarian figures only.

  • 210 Palestinians reportedly killed during Israeli hostage recovery operation
  • I don't doubt the accuracy of those figures but when it comes to things like Israel accusing Hamas of using human shields or setting up bases inside schools and Hamas saying "nuh uh", without photo or video proof it's hard to say either way.

  • Thoughts on Hong Kong urbanism?

    This image is from Google Maps and depicts Maritime Square on Tsing Yi, the island where my grandmother lives. I chose it because I think it is the embodiment of the new millennium Hong Kong urban development.

    The entire development is built by the MTR Corporation, a Government-owned publicly traded company that is primarily known for running the Hong Kong metro system of the same name.

    The primary attraction of this development is the eponymous Maritime Square Mall, a large five-storey indoor shopping arcade. It is attached to Tsing Yi Station, a metro station on the overground Tung Chung Line and there is a small bus interchange on the ground floor.

    The mall has shops including a grocery store, around a dozen restaurants, a Marks & Spencer, bakeries, clothing retailers, electronics stores, a few banks, and some miscellaneous other stores. Notably NOT in the building is a school, otherwise, you might even be able to spend your whole life without leaving it.

    There are several towers extending out of the main mall complex which contain hundreds of units of (unaffordable) housing. I think there is a botanical garden on the roof, too. The entrance to these towers is inside the mall, where there's just a lift lobby where you'd expect a shop to be. The lift lobby is closed to the public; a keycard or code is required to enter.

    I think it's a similar concept to a 15-minute city, but more like a 15-minute building.

    7

    U.S. sends Ukraine seized Iranian-made weapons

    The Pentagon has provided Ukraine with thousands of Iranian-made weapons seized before they could reach Houthi militants in Yemen, U.S. officials said Tuesday. It’s the Biden administration’s latest infusion of emergency military support for Kyiv while a multibillion-dollar aid package remains stalled in the Republican-led House.

    The weapons include 5,000 Kalashnikov rifles, machine guns, sniper rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, along with a half-million rounds of ammunition. They were seized from four “stateless vessels” between 2021 and 2023 and made available for transfer to Ukraine through a Justice Department civil forfeiture program targeting Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, according to U.S. Central Command, which oversees military operations in the Middle East.

    Officials said Iran intended to supply the weapons to the Houthis, who have staged a months-long assault on commercial and military vessels transiting off the Arabian Peninsula. Central Command said the cache is enough to supply rifles to an entire Ukrainian brigade, which vary in size but typically include a few thousand soldiers.

    4

    U.S. sends Ukraine seized Iranian-made weapons

    The Pentagon has provided Ukraine with thousands of Iranian-made weapons seized before they could reach Houthi militants in Yemen, U.S. officials said Tuesday. It’s the Biden administration’s latest infusion of emergency military support for Kyiv while a multibillion-dollar aid package remains stalled in the Republican-led House.

    The weapons include 5,000 Kalashnikov rifles, machine guns, sniper rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, along with a half-million rounds of ammunition. They were seized from four “stateless vessels” between 2021 and 2023 and made available for transfer to Ukraine through a Justice Department civil forfeiture program targeting Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, according to U.S. Central Command, which oversees military operations in the Middle East.

    Officials said Iran intended to supply the weapons to the Houthis, who have staged a months-long assault on commercial and military vessels transiting off the Arabian Peninsula. Central Command said the cache is enough to supply rifles to an entire Ukrainian brigade, which vary in size but typically include a few thousand soldiers.

    2

    Is there a way to donate outside of Google Play?

    Google eats 30% of in-app purchases so I'd like to donate directly if possible.

    If there is a way to do this, perhaps add it to the community's sidebar?

    3
    abc7news.com Tesla repays San Jose pie shop owner after last-minute cancellation

    "I'm so super grateful": More than an hour after Rasetarinera's Monday interview with ABC7 News, she confirmed that Tesla had officially repaid the $2,000 that she was out for the purchase of the ingredients.

    Tesla repays San Jose pie shop owner after last-minute cancellation

    tl;dr After local news aired the story, Tesla has paid the pie shop $2,000, the cost of ingredients for the cancelled order.

    44

    It is a huge failure in communication to pretend that distro upgrades are entirely different versions of the operating system. It does nothing but make Linux seem more complex than it actually is.

    The jump in distro versions, say, from Fedora 38 to Fedora 39, is not the same as the jump from Windows 10 to Windows 11. It's more like the jump from version 23H2 to 24H2.

    Now, I'm sure even most Windows users among those reading will ask "wtf are 23H2 and 24H2"? The answer is that those version numbers are the Windows analogue to the "23.10" at the end of "Ubuntu 23.10". But the difference is that this distinction is invisible to Windows users.

    Why?

    Linux distros present these as "operating system upgrades", which makes it seem like you're moving from two different and incompatible operating systems. Windows calls them "feature updates". They're presented as a big deal in Linux, whereas on Windows, it's just an unusually large update.

    This has the effect of making it seem like Linux is constantly breaking software and that you need to move to a completely different OS every six to nine months, which is completely false. While that might've been true in the past, it is increasingly true today that anything that will run on, say, Ubuntu 22.04 can also run without modification (except maybe for hardcoded version checks/repository names) on Ubuntu 23.10, and will still probably work on Ubuntu 24.04. It's not guaranteed, but neither is it on Windows, and the odds are very good either way.

    I will end on the remark that for many distros, a version upgrade is implemented as nothing more than changing the repositories and then downloading the new versions of all the packages present and running a few scripts. The only relevant changes (from the user's perspective) is usually the implementation of new features and maybe a few changes to the UI. In other words, "feature update" describes it perfectly.

    41

    Banks in Hong Kong can print their own money. There are 8 different designs in circulation.

    Before someone asks why there isn't insane inflation from banks printing an infinite amount of money for themselves, the Hong Kong dollar is pegged to the US dollar. In order to be allowed to print HKD, banks must have an equivalent amount of USD on deposit.

    11