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Looong distance relationship
  • COmoVIng Distance?

  • Mathematicians
  • Maybe because people get into this kind of very abstract field to escape reality and that would mean reality is catching up on them and reducing their freedom to not have to care about consequences.

  • Mother Gaia and Humans
  • No no no, it's way more comfortable thinking that I don't have to make any big efforts because it's only the responsibility of some elite.

  • There are no guardrails in life
  • Our sauteed with onions really good too. People who don't like greens probably only know them boiled in water which washes the taste away.

  • LPT Do it.
  • Fuck, I’m old privileged.

  • LPT Do it.
  • Just fork git to handle zipping, formatting and ignoring metadata! Or just put your office document in the cloud and use the basic versioning it provides.

  • LPT Do it.
  • Git is a tool that makes it convenient and lightweight to keep past snapshots of a directory of text files (called a repository) and compare them. It also makes it easy to have multiple people work in parallel on the content of the directory, see the differences and merge everything into a common version. It is essential in programming, it's called versioning or version control.
    Although it is not easy to access for non programmers because it's based on slightly obscure command lines. So it's a bit of an over-engineering to use it for a single file edited by a single person. Especially because you can now put those on the cloud and have some form of version control that allows to easily compare and go back to previous versions graphically.
    It may be worth it if it's a long document that you work upon for a long time, such as a PhD thesis.

  • Here's one for the nature lovers
  • So this post is green washing.

  • Polisci
  • Well they did demonstrate that in a non trivial system of axioms, there will always be true statements that are unprovable. Do they kinda accepted that they will never be able to find everything. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gödel's_incompleteness_theorems

  • Scarlett Johansson denied OpenAI the right to use her voice. They used it anyway.
  • And traumatizing developing countries labor with what the internet has of most terrible.

  • Linux Inventor Says He Doesn’t Believe in Crypto
  • Crypto means hidden, stop using it to talk about cryptography.

  • Think Tobey planned this?
  • There's some uncannyness in face element position and orientations.

  • Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi, known for brutal crackdowns against political opposition, dies at 63
  • Too obvious. More like, "We're going to use slightly less lubricated ball bearings, position the aircraft on the market just where they will buy it, the maintenance specificity will not be documented, and it should kill a couple of important people in 50 years!". (Loosely inspired by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet)

  • Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi, known for brutal crackdowns against political opposition, dies at 63
  • Cue conspiracy on a CIA plan that took 50 years to yield results.

  • Unholy contortions are the best compliment
  • Marginalia is general term for whatever was drawn in the margins, I think a more precise term is drollery, from French drĂŽle which means funny. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drollery

  • Unexpectedly Wholesome
  • The Moulin Rouge version of Holiday on Ice.

  • Free time [Mr. Lovenstein]
  • It's both, you need both.

  • The reality of modern tech
  • USB charger ?

  • Night Club [Safely Endangered]
  • I want more of you.

  • Richard P Feynman on “Why are we here?”

    > I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. I have approximate answers, and possible beliefs, and different degrees of uncertainty about different things, but I am not absolutely sure of anything. There are many things I don't know anything about, such as whether it means anything to ask "Why are we here?" I might think about it a little bit, and if I can't figure it out then I go on to something else. But I don't have to know an answer. I don't feel frightened by not knowing things, by being lost in the mysterious universe without having any purpose - which is the way it really is, as far as I can tell.

    5
    Random observations from a Parisian in Tokyo: Spring in Japan, after the famous sakura, it's time for tsutsuji (azalea, rhododendron)

    cross-posted from: https://jlai.lu/post/6354297

    > They contain a sweet honey that you can taste by sucking the bottom, a friend made me taste. I just did some research about it for this post. It appears some are actually toxic, and it's very hard to tell the difference.

    0
    Random observations from a Parisian in Tokyo: Spring in Japan, after the famous sakura, it's time for tsutsuji (azalea, rhododendron)

    They contain a sweet honey that you can taste by sucking the bottom, a friend made me taste. I just did some research about it for this post. It appears some are actually toxic, and it's very hard to tell the difference.

    3
    En cherchant les biais politiques des médias français, je suis tombé sur cette infographie intéressante.

    Source infographie : https://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2022/02/28/audiovisuel-les-biais-politiques-passes-a-la-moulinette-statistique_6115591_1650684.html Source scientifique : https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4036211

    Je cherchais plutÎt une carte comme celle-ci pour les médias des USA, mais je n'ai pas trouvé. https://www.allsides.com/media-bias/media-bias-chart

    14
    This colorful collage on NHK News sidebar

    Source for now: https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20240423_08/

    1
    ă‚ă±ăš Random observations from a Parisian in Tokyo: The number of different electronic payment methods is insane.

    cross-posted from: https://jlai.lu/post/6118881

    > An illustration of the "ultra free" market in Japan, is the insane amount of ways to pay at the cashier. It seems every financial group thought they could do better than the other, and for some reason I don't understand, they didn't eat each other, they just coexist. > > The main categories are: bank card, payment apps connected to bank account, transportation cards, electronic money. They may work through card reader, no-contact, bar code scan or QR code scan. For the last two, you are either scanned or you have to scan them. > > Also, Japan loves "points". If you know the cashback system, where you get something like 1% of your bill back, in Japan they usually get points back, which are of course limited to shops accepting those points. So on top of payment methods you also have a dozen of points system, either specific to the shop brand or from a different company that may have agreements with different merchants. > > Despite that, cash remains essential, it's very common to end up in a restaurant that only accepts cash, even the convenience of paying your house bills at the konbini requires cash.

    5
    ă‚ă±ăš Random observations from a Parisian in Tokyo: The number of different electronic payment methods is insane.

    An illustration of the "ultra free" market in Japan, is the insane amount of ways to pay at the cashier. It seems every financial group thought they could do better than the other, and for some reason I don't understand, they didn't eat each other, they just coexist.

    The main categories are: bank card, payment apps connected to bank account, transportation cards, electronic money. They may work through card reader, no-contact, bar code scan or QR code scan. For the last two, you are either scanned or you have to scan them.

    Also, Japan loves "points". If you know the cashback system, where you get something like 1% of your bill back, in Japan they usually get points back, which are of course limited to shops accepting those points. So on top of payment methods you also have a dozen of points system, either specific to the shop brand or from a different company that may have agreements with different merchants.

    Despite that, cash remains essential, it's very common to end up in a restaurant that only accepts cash, even the convenience of paying your house bills at the konbini requires cash.

    0
    Random observations from a Parisian in Tokyo: I love the sink on top of the toilets way more than the electronics.

    I'm not super convinced by the water jet. It can make a mess, it requires a lot of paper to dry if you don't want to wet your pants and if you don't have soap, are you really cleaning? Heating seat feels like overabundance (a common thing in Japan). But the sink to clean your hands and reuse this gray water for the next flush is amazing. I think it should be made mandatory in every region with water resources issues. It's still not clear to me, however, if using soap there will cause more maintenance issues or not.

    17
    Vous choisissez quoi comme noms/mél jetables quand vous vous inscrivez sur des sites qui ne méritent pas votre vraie identité ?

    Personnellement, j'aime bien mettre Pascal Obispo. Ça me fait toujours marrer d'imaginer un analyste qui va tomber dessus.

    26
    « Faute de bras, l’immigration est en hausse constante au Japon »
    www.lemonde.fr « Faute de bras, l’immigration est en hausse constante au Japon Â»

    CHRONIQUE. Pour la premiĂšre fois de son histoire, l’archipel nippon a dĂ©passĂ© en 2023 le seuil des 2 millions de travailleurs immigrĂ©s. Cette tendance, qui s’étend Ă  tous les secteurs, cache un grand mystĂšre : la stagnation des salaires, en dĂ©pit de la pĂ©nurie. Tout un dĂ©fi pour le go...

    « Faute de bras, l’immigration est en hausse constante au Japon Â»

    > Avec un chĂŽmage Ă  2,4 % en dĂ©cembre 2023, il existe 120 offres d’emploi pour 100 demandeurs. DĂ©sormais, de nombreuses petites entreprises sont poussĂ©es Ă  la faillite, faute de bras. ... > la stagnation des salaires, en dĂ©pit de la pĂ©nurie. Ceux-ci ont encore baissĂ© de 3 % en valeur rĂ©elle en 2023.

    1
    Pourquoi la mĂ©ritocratie n’existe pas

    “Quand on veut, on peut”. C’est une idĂ©e extrĂȘmement rĂ©pandue, dans la culture, les mĂ©dias ou la politique : la France est, et doit ĂȘtre, un pays mĂ©ritocratique, un pays oĂč l’on rĂ©ussit par la force de son mĂ©rite. Cet argument rĂ©guliĂšrement avancĂ© par les plus privilĂ©giĂ©s sert surtout Ă  lĂ©gitimer l’existence du systĂšme en place. La mĂ©ritocratie existe-t-elle vraiment ? En d’autres termes, partons-nous rĂ©ellement avec les mĂȘmes chances dans la vie ? L’effort est-il rĂ©compensĂ© socialement et Ă©conomiquement en France ? Est-il mĂȘme souhaitable que le talent et le travail soient Ă  ce point rĂ©compensĂ©s ? Ne faudrait-il pas remplacer l’adage quand on veut on peut, par quand on peut, on veut ? ÉlĂ©ments de rĂ©ponse avec SalomĂ© SaquĂ©.

    Journaliste : Salomé Saqué Montage : Colas Tran Son : Baptiste Veilhan Graphisme : Morgane Sabouret Production : Hugo Bot Delpérié Directeur des programmes : Mathias Enthoven Rédaction en chef : Soumaya Benaïssa Directeur de la rédaction : Denis Robert

    Le site : https://www.blast-info.fr/

    1
    « Le peuple russe vit peut-ĂȘtre le meilleur moment de sa vie »
    www.lemonde.fr « Le peuple russe vit peut-ĂȘtre le meilleur moment de sa vie Â»

    TRIBUNE. L’historien russe SergueĂŻ Tchernychev considĂšre, dans une tribune au « Monde Â», que, dans leur grande majoritĂ©, ses compatriotes n’ont rien perdu du fait de la guerre en Ukraine car, n’ayant jamais rien eu, ils n’avaient « rien de spĂ©cial Ă  perdre Â».

    « Le peuple russe vit peut-ĂȘtre le meilleur moment de sa vie Â»

    >Ludmila PetranovskaĂŻa, une psychologue de renom, a rĂ©cemment tentĂ© de dresser la liste de toutes les pertes subies par le peuple russe afin de montrer que « tous les Russes ne bĂ©nĂ©ficient pas de cette guerre ». Sa liste mentionne : l’effondrement de la monnaie nationale et des valeurs mobiliĂšres ; la fermeture mondiale des frontiĂšres aux touristes russes ; la fin des perspectives d’études Ă  l’étranger pour les jeunes ; la restriction des droits civils et des libertĂ©s ; la dĂ©gradation de l’enseignement et de la culture ; la sĂ©paration des familles en raison de l’émigration, etc. > >AprĂšs avoir lu cette liste, j’ai remerciĂ© une fois de plus le destin de ne pas ĂȘtre nĂ© Ă  Moscou et de ne pas avoir encore perdu tout contact avec la rĂ©alitĂ©. Parce que si l’on considĂšre que les deux tiers de la population russe sont « le peuple russe », alors « le peuple russe » n’a rien perdu de tout cela. Pour la bonne raison qu’il ne l’a jamais eu.

    1
    Karate @lemmy.world oce 🐆 @jlai.lu
    Last weekend, France celebrated its first two 10th dan karate masters Dominique Valera and Jean-Pierre Lavorato

    !

    Jean Pierre Lavorato is a 79-year-old Shotokan karate-do expert with more than 60 years of practice. He started in 1962 with sensei Henry Plée, the pioneer of karate in Europe, and later followed sensei Taïji Kase when he settled in France. In his youth, he became European team champion, France champion and the coach of a multitude of later France champions. Since then, he has been continuously teaching. Despite his advanced age, he keeps giving multiple traineeships a week all around France as well as the rest of the world with a seemingly inexhaustible kime. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5KYCEadDDo

    !

    Dominique Valera is a 76-year-old Full Contact karate pioneer. He began Shotokan karate in 1960, he became multiple times karate champion of France individual, European champion individual and by team, and World champion by team. From 1975, he kick-started full-contact karate in Europe, following his friend Bill Wallace and Joe Lewis. He became 4 times European full-contact champion and 2 times World vice-champion. Since then, he became the leading expert of full-contact karate in France and spends his year circulating in France to represent full-contact with incredible energy and joy. https://youtu.be/HhoJIn2-FC4?t=592

    The two masters and friends hugging each other after receiving their 10th dan. !

    0
    [Fait maison] Aubergines chinoises aux 5 épices et sauce soja, omelette roulée et quinoa

    J'adore les aubergines Ă  la chinoise, j'ai Ă  peu prĂšs retrouvĂ© le gout avec cette recette : https://www.undejeunerdesoleil.com/2016/09/aubergines-sautees-sauce-soja.html. À la diffĂ©rence que je ne les fais pas suer avec du sel, parce qu'aprĂšs, c'est difficile Ă  dessaler. À la place, je les fais sĂ©cher Ă  sec dans la poĂȘle avant de les faire sauter comme dans la recette. Il faut bien attendre que les aubergines soient fondantes.

    L'omelette est mĂ©langĂ©e avec de la sauce soja Ă  la place du sel. Je dĂ©verse le mĂ©lange dans une grande poĂȘle huilĂ©e et bien chaude. Je la fais remonter sur deux cĂŽtĂ©s opposĂ©s pour augmenter sa longueur. Ça me donne aussi une meilleure prise pour commencer Ă  la rouler. Quand je l'ai roulĂ© au 3/4, je la recentre et chasse la liquide pas encore cuit du cĂŽtĂ© Ă  rouler pour qu'il crĂ©e encore de la longueur. On peut ĂȘtre plus au moins rapide selon le niveau de cuisson souhaitĂ©.

    Le quinoa est cuit Ă  l'eau, puis passĂ© Ă  la poĂȘle un peu pour le rendre un peu croustillant et assaisonnĂ© Ă  la sauce soja. Je laisse toujours un peu cuire la sauce soja dans la poĂȘle pour qu'elle rĂ©vĂšle son goĂ»t carnĂ©.

    1
    oce oce 🐆 @jlai.lu

    I try to contribute to things getting better, sometimes through polite rational skepticism. Disagreeing with your comment ≠ supporting the opposite side, I support rationality. Let's discuss to refine the arguments that make things better sustainably. Always happy to question our beliefs.

    Posts 25
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