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ace Ananace @lemmy.ananace.dev

Just another Swedish programming sysadmin person. Coffee is always the answer.

And beware my spaghet.

Posts 30
Comments 183
What are some of the obstacles of making an existing game open source?
  • Well, one available case you can look at is Uru: Live / Myst Online, currently running under the name Myst Online: Uru Live: Again.

    They open-sourced their Dirt/Headspin/Plasma engine, which required stripping out - among other things - the PhysX code from it.

  • Flatpak haters seem to believe that if an app isn't on their distro's repos, it's the developers' fault.
  • Well, Flatpak always builds the aliases, so as long as the <installation>/exports/bin folder is in $PATH there's no need to symlink.

    If you're talking specifically about having symlinks with some arbitrary name that you prefer, then that's something you'll have to do yourself, the Flatpak applications only provide their canonical name after all.
    You could probably do something like that with inotify and a simple script though, just point it at the exports/bin folders for the installations that you care about, and set up your own mapping between canonical names and whatever names you prefer.

  • Flatpak haters seem to believe that if an app isn't on their distro's repos, it's the developers' fault.
  • In regards to sandboxing, it only gets as far in the way as you ask it to. For applications that you're not planning on putting on FlatHub anyway you can be just as open as you want to be, i.e. just adding / - or host as it's called - as read-write to the app. (OpenMW still does that as we had some issues with the data extraction for original Morrowind install media)

    If you do want to sandbox though, users are able to poke just as many holes as they want - or add their own restrictions atop whatever sandboxing you set up for the application. Flatpak itself has the flatpak override tool for this, or there's graphical UIs like flatseal and the KDE control center module..

  • Flatpak haters seem to believe that if an app isn't on their distro's repos, it's the developers' fault.
  • Well, if you have any form of build script, makefile, or CI, then you can easily shove that into a flatpak-builder manifest and push the build repo anywhere you want. The default OSTree repository format can be served from any old webserver or S3 bucket after all.

    I've done this for personal projects many times, since it's a ridiculously easy way to get scalable distribution and automatic updates in place.

  • Flatpak haters seem to believe that if an app isn't on their distro's repos, it's the developers' fault.
  • The majority of AppImages I've seen have been dynamically linked, yes. But it's also used for packaging assets.

  • Flatpak haters seem to believe that if an app isn't on their distro's repos, it's the developers' fault.
  • As long as your application is statically linked, I don't see any issue with that.

  • Flatpak haters seem to believe that if an app isn't on their distro's repos, it's the developers' fault.
  • Well, Flatpak installs aliases, so as long as your distribution - or yourself - add the <installation>/exports/bin path to $PATH, then you'll be able to use the application IDs to launch them.

    And if you want to have the Flatpak available under a different name than its ID, you can always symlink the exported bin to whatever name you'd personally prefer.
    I've got Blender set up that way myself, with the org.blender.Blender bin symlinked to /usr/local/bin/blender, so that some older applications that expect to be able to simply interop with it are able to.

  • Flatpak haters seem to believe that if an app isn't on their distro's repos, it's the developers' fault.
  • Ah, I had one of those wireless sticks from Netgear as well, probably a different model but still a royal pain to get it working.
    Luckily ndiswrapper has become a thing of the past nowadays.

  • Kobo’s great color e-readers are held back by lock-in
  • Ended up getting a Kobo Elipsa 2E myself a while back, and it's been a real pleasure to use. There's no stupid device-level DRM on it to try and prevent me from actually using it for my reading, and the onboard storage is just a simple microSD so it's really easy to upgrade if I want to fit even more books.

    KOReader has been a real treat to run on it, letting me sync books from my home NAS over WebDav, push books directly to it over scp, I've even been poking at a plugin to have it automatically sync books off of a local reading tracker I've written.

  • Nexus mods want feedback from Linux / Steam Deck users on their new cross-platform app
  • Seems to work with my personal setup at least, with two libraries - the default on ~/.local/share/steam, and one on /mnt/storage/steam - and Stardew Valley installed in the secondary storage library

  • Props to Alpine and Kali for disabling this bullshit out of the box
  • You're lucky to not have to deal with some of this hardware then, because it really feels like there are manufacturers who are determined to rediscover as many solved problems as they possibly can.

    Got to spend way too much time last year with a certain piece of HPC hardware that can sometimes finish booting, and then sit idle at the login prompt for almost half a minute before the onboard NIC finally decides to appear on the PCI bus.
    The most 'amusing' part is that it does have the onboard NIC functional during boot, since it's a netbooted system. It just seems to go into some kind of hard reset when handing over to the OS.

    Of course, that's really nothing compared to a couple of multi-socket storage servers we have, which sometime drop half the PCI bus on the floor when under certain kinds of load, requiring them to be unplugged from power entirely before the bus can be used again.

  • Props to Alpine and Kali for disabling this bullshit out of the box
  • The predictable interface naming has solved a few issues at work, mainly in regards to when we have to work with expensive piece-of-shit (enterprise) systems, since they sometimes explode if your server changes interface names.
    Normally wouldn't be an issue, but a bunch of our hardware - multiple vendors and all - initialize the onboard NIC pretty late, which causes them to switch position almost every other boot.

    I've personally stopped caring about interface names nowadays though, I just use automation to shove NetworkManager onto the machine and use it to get a properly managed connection instead, so it can deal with all the stupid things that the hardware does.

  • What is your favourite game with native Linux port?
  • Factorio is great, I'm also a fan of X4.

  • Jade Shadows update is currently deploying.
  • Now that's one hefty changelog.

  • Oh tell me again how it loads faster and takes up less resources
  • In general, browser benchmarks seem to often favor Firefox in terms of startup and first interaction timings, and often favor Chrome when it comes to crunching large amounts of data through JavaScript.
    I.e. for pages which use small amounts of JavaScript, but call into it quickly after loading, Firefox tends to come out on top. But for pages which load lots of JavaScript and then run it constantly, Chrome tends to come out on top.

    We're usually talking milliseconds-level of difference here though. So if you're using a mobile browser or a low-power laptop, then the difference is often not measurable at all, unless the page is specifically optimized for one or the other.

  • Oh tell me again how it loads faster and takes up less resources
  • There's a bunch of extensions that allow you to switch user-agent easily, I personally use this one, it includes a list of known strings to choose between as well.

  • Oh tell me again how it loads faster and takes up less resources
  • They used to also use the unreleased version 0 of shadow DOM for building the Polymer UI, which - being a Chrome-only prototype - understandably didn't work on Firefox, and therefore instead used a really slow Javascript polyfill to render its UI.

    I haven't checked on it lately, but I imagine they must've changed at least that by now.

  • Oh tell me again how it loads faster and takes up less resources
  • One thing you can test is to apply a Chrome user-agent on Firefox when visiting YouTube. In my personal experience that actually noticeably improves the situation.

  • UK Woman Mistaken As Shoplifter By Facewatch, Now She's Banned From All Stores With Facial Recognition Tech
  • The EU AI act classifies AI based on risk (in case of mistakes etc), and things like criminality assessment is classed as an unacceptable risk, and is therefore prohibited without exception.

    There's a great high level summary available for the act, if you don't want to read the hundreds of pages of text.

  • UK Woman Mistaken As Shoplifter By Facewatch, Now She's Banned From All Stores With Facial Recognition Tech
  • They couldn't possibly do that, the EU has banned it after all.

  • btrfs @lemmy.ml Ananace @lemmy.ananace.dev

    [PATCH v4 00/46] btrfs: add fscrypt support

    The fscrypt work continues to steadily plod along, really hoping that there won't need to be many more version of the patchset, especially seeing as a bunch of the non-BTRFS-specific work has already landed.

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    Where old people go.

    18

    Warp NaCLs

    I will not be taking any questions.

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    btrfs @lemmy.ml Ananace @lemmy.ananace.dev

    [PATCH v2 00/36] btrfs: add fscrypt support

    Looks like it's v2 time.

    The btrfs-progs -side patch is here.

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    Audio Horror

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    Payday 3 lets you steal the FoV slider too.

    Here's the Nitter link; https://nitter.net/neoncaelestis/status/1700580768458936469

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    Lemmy Helm Chart

    Creating this thread here as a general place for knowledge/discussion/etc about the Lemmy Chart.

    The chart is used for the lemmy.ananace.dev server, and will continue to be used so for the foreseeable future.

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