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will_a113 @lemmy.ml
Posts 27
Comments 148

How fast can a human possibly run 100 meters? (answer: about 7 seconds)

bigthink.com How fast can a human possibly run 100 meters?

The all-time record is Usain Bolt's 9.58 seconds, set in 2009. What is the fastest time, ultimately, for an ideal human body?

How fast can a human possibly run 100 meters?
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On Open Source and the Sustainability of the Commons
  • This is a good, short read. For those who are unfamiliar with the AGPL license that the author proposes we all start using, the main difference (and I am not a lawyer) is that under the AGPL, the source code including any modifications must also be made available to all users interacting with the software over a network. This prevents companies from making proprietary versions of AGPL software that are only accessible as a web service, which is one of the big ways that corporations are able to profit from GPL source code contributions these days.

  • Solar PV Installations Will Reach Up To 660 Gigawatts In 2024 - CleanTechnica
  • Yup, typically I just mentally multiply by 1000 (nice round numbers). But obviously a 100MW farm in the Sahara is going to produce more in a year than the same 100MW farm in Germany. It’d be cool to see a list on a global scale that showed a table and maybe generation vs demand curves for the area they serve. Maybe I’ll put it on my “projects I’ll never get to” list.

  • Solar PV Installations Will Reach Up To 660 Gigawatts In 2024 - CleanTechnica
  • Like capacity x capacity factor, e.g. if your 100MW site produces power 50% of the time (because of nighttime, clouds, etc) then it would produce, over the course of a year 100,000,000 x 24 x 365 x 0.5 = 438 GWh annually (very simplified).

  • Stonehenge covered in powder paint by Just Stop Oil protesters - BBC News
  • I think these guys get headlines exactly because they target things that “belong” to all of us. PETA throwing red paint on some rich schmuck wearing furs? That might get a minute of airtime. But (safely) paint Stonehenge, throw baked beans on the Mona Lisa, etc and every news outlet will cover it.

  • Boeing and Airbus may have used 'counterfeit' titanium in planes, FAA says
  • It’s not like they swapped titanium for balsa wood. The origin docs were falsified or missing, which could mean anything from they weren’t the right purity but were shipped anyway to they were imported from Russia and illegally bypassing sanctions.

  • Virginia NAACP files suit against school board that restored names of Confederate leaders
  • I’d let all of these statues and monuments stand, but require the descriptions to all be preceded with “defeated traitor”. So instead of the Robert E Lee Memorial Park or whatever it would now be the Defeated Traitor Robert E Lee Memorial Park. Require it to be referred to that way on Google Maps, local newscasts, etc and see how quickly people suddenly want to rename them.

  • How long until running stops sucking?
  • What do you hate specifically -- e.g. exercising in general, getting hot and sweaty, foot/leg/joint pain, your location or route, having to be alone with your thoughts for a while, etc? I've been running for nearly 3 decades now (yikes), and even as a kid I remember the thing that made it "click" with me is the realization that I literally could not be doing anything else at the same time (aside from listening to music, I guess).

    I think that unless you are having physical pain (in which case the usual applies - check your shoes, modify your gait, reduce or restructure your runs to be more comfortable), you have to get into the headspace of just mentally doing nothing, which can be hard for some people.

    FWIW I don't know anyone who, in the middle of a 10k run in 90 degree heat with a side stitch says "I feel awesome right now!", but I do know many, many people who will finish out that run, stop for a moment and then go "ahhhhhhh."

  • Trump trial live updates: Trump says 'Mother Teresa could not beat these charges' as jury deliberates
  • This is actually pretty clever. If he's found guilty then it's rigged since even Mother Teresa would have been found guilty. If he's found not guilty though, then he's even better than Mother Teresa, since he beat a rap that would have taken her down or whatever.

  • The USDA’s gardening zones shifted. This map shows you what’s changed.

    apps.npr.org The USDA’s gardening zones shifted. This map shows you what’s changed in vivid detail

    There's a good chance your zone shifted when the USDA updated its plant hardiness map in 2023. Zoom in on what that means for your garden.

    The USDA’s gardening zones shifted. This map shows you what’s changed in vivid detail
    3
    Evolution of the alphabet
  • Hangul

    Oh, yup, these are not derived from Phoenecian, but considering how recent they are they were developed after the concept of a phonetic alphabet had already been widely circulated

  • Swiss startup develops AI-driven humanoid hand

    thenextweb.com Swiss startup to advance collaborative robots with GenAI humanoid hand

    Zurich-based mimic has raised $2.5mn to further develop its AI-powered humanoid hand that can perform repetitive and demanding manual tasks.

    Swiss startup to advance collaborative robots with GenAI humanoid hand
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    Orthopedic Surgeon Uses Apple Vision Pro for Rotator Cuff Surgery

    hothardware.com Orthopedic Doctor Uses Apple Vision Pro For Game-Changing Surgery Assist

    The ability to see and highlight critical details more easily or have surgery-aiding software could improve medical outcomes for all.

    Orthopedic Doctor Uses Apple Vision Pro For Game-Changing Surgery Assist

    In this niche case the Vision Pro seems like it has some compelling benefits.

    15

    NASA’s Voyager 1 Resumes Sending Engineering Updates to Earth!

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    The Open Home Foundation: Home Assistant's new foundation - and goal to become a consumer brand

    arstechnica.com Home Assistant has a new foundation and a goal to become a consumer brand

    Can a non-profit foundation get Home Assistant to the point of Home Depot boxes?

    Home Assistant has a new foundation and a goal to become a consumer brand
    1

    Peter Higgs, who predicted the existence of the Higgs Boson, has died at 94

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    Fourteen LLMs fight it out in Street Fighter III — Faster models make the best street fighters.

    3

    Magnitude 4.8 Earthquake Strikes New York Metro Area and East Coast

    www.nbcnews.com Earthquake hits U.S. East Coast, shaking buildings from Philadelphia to Boston

    The U.S. Geological Survey initially measured the earthquake at a 4.8-magnitude.

    Earthquake hits U.S. East Coast, shaking buildings from Philadelphia to Boston

    Raw data from the USGS: https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000ma74/executive

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    www.tomshardware.com This Raspberry Pi volumetric display is a new spin on LED 3D animations

    The Raspberry Pi powers the show, but the real star is the exquisite build and test process to achieve 600 RPM

    This Raspberry Pi volumetric display is a new spin on LED 3D animations

    Some serious engineering makes for a pretty compelling voxel display. Plus the whole build saga is on Mastodon! Go Fediverse!

    9
    arstechnica.com FCC to declare AI-generated voices in robocalls illegal under existing law

    Robocalls with AI voices to be regulated under Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

    FCC to declare AI-generated voices in robocalls illegal under existing law

    Robocalls with AI voices to be regulated under Telephone Consumer Protection Act, the agency says. I'm pretty sure this puts us on the timeline where we eventually get incredible, futuristic tech, but computers and robots still sound mechanical and fake.

    85

    Starlink's Laser System is Beaming 42 Petabytes of Data Per Day

    SpaceX's laser system for Starlink is delivering over 42 petabytes of data for customers per day, an engineer revealed today. That translates into 42 million gigabytes. Each of the 9,000 lasers in the network is capable of transmitting at 100Gbps, and satellites can form ad-hoc mesh networks to complete long-haul transmissions when there are no ground towers nearby (like when they're going across oceans).

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    www.theregister.com Cory Doctorow wants to wipe away enshittification of tech

    It's not just you – things really are getting worse

    Cory Doctorow wants to wipe away enshittification of tech

    Doctrow argues that nascent tech unionization (which we're closer to having now than ever before) combined with bipartisan fear (and consequent regulation) either directly or via agencies like the FTC and FCC can help to curb Big Tech's power, and the enshittification that it has wrought.

    63

    Lemmy 0.19 should be called Turbo Edition

    Noticed I was logged out of lemmy.ml this morning. When I logged in, everything looked the same, but... "All" loaded instantly. Switching to "Subscribed" was just as fast. Post thumbnails came up as quickly as I could scroll.

    I don't know if it's the new software or if y'all cleared out some cruft when restarting the services, but from this end-user's perspective, Lemmy 0.19.0-rc.8 flies. Nicely done!

    10

    The Battle Over Books3 Could Change AI Forever

    Increasingly, the authors of works being used to train large language models are complaining (and rightfully so) that they never gave permission for such a use-case. If I were an LLM company, I'd be seriously looking for a Plan B right now, whether that's engaging publishing companies to come up with new licensing options, paying 1,000,000 grad students to write 1,000,000 lines of prose, or something else entirely.

    9
    health @lemmy.ml will_a113 @lemmy.ml
    newatlas.com Antioxidants such as vitamin C found to spur cancer growth & metastasis

    A new study has found that antioxidants like vitamins C and E activate a mechanism that stimulates the growth of new blood vessels in cancer tumors, helping them to grow and spread. The researchers say their findings highlight the potential risk of taking antioxidant supplements when they’re not…

    Antioxidants such as vitamin C found to spur cancer growth & metastasis

    “We’ve found that antioxidants activate a mechanism that causes cancer tumors to form new blood vessels, which is surprising since it was previously thought that antioxidants have a protective effect,” said Martin Bergö, a new study’s author. “The new blood vessels nourish the tumors and can help them grow and spread.” It's worth noting that there's no harm in consuming normal antioxidant-rich foods in normal quantities, though.

    3

    In an important breakthrough (to cats), scientists figure out why cats love tuna so much

    Ever wonder why cats love tuna? Well apparently a bunch of scientists did too, and they found the answer: the umami flavor (savoriness in English, I guess), is a cat's most favorite (as opposed to mine, which is definitely sweet).

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    United States | News & Politics @lemmy.ml will_a113 @lemmy.ml

    Study Finds Social Media Conversations Can Reduce Political Polarization, Particularly Among Republicans

    Political polarization toned down through anonymous online chats

    Researchers conducted a study to see if social media could help bridge the political divide by facilitating anonymous conversations between individuals with opposing political views. The study used an app called DiscussIt, which allowed users to have anonymous one-on-one discussions about controversial topics. The researchers found that these conversations reduced polarization, particularly among Republican participants. However, there are practical challenges to implementing this approach on a larger scale, as most people do not engage in one-on-one conversations with strangers on social media. Nonetheless, the findings suggest that displaying respect for political opponents and engaging in civil conversations can make a difference in reducing polarization.

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    Harvesting almost-unlimited energy (in tiny amounts) from ripples in graphene

    Scientists have figured out how to harness Brownian motion -- literally the thermal energy of individual molecules -- to make electricity, by cleverly connecting diodes up to pieces of graphene, which are atom-thick sheets of Carbon. The team has successfully demonstrated their theory (which was previously thought to be impossible by prominent physicists like Richard Feynman), and are now trying to make a kind of micro-harvester that can basically produce inexhaustible power for things like smart sensors.

    The most impressive thing about the system is that it doesn't require a thermal gradient to do work, like other kinds of heat-harvesting systems (Stirling engines, Peltier junctions, etc.). As long as it's a bit above absolute zero, there's enough thermal energy "in the system" to make the graphene vibrate continuously, which induces a current that the diodes can then pump out.

    Original journal link: https://journals.aps.org/pre/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevE.108.024130

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    LLaMA.cpp: A GPT3-level LLM that can run on your desktop

    LLaMA.cpp is a project on GitHub that implements inferencing of a LLaMA model in pure C/C++. The performance is pretty amazing given the limited hardware it can run on (even a Pi, if you have patience), and the author gives an explanation of how that's even possible (hint: memory bandwidth).

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