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kernelle @lemmy.world
Posts 6
Comments 147
Ah yes, organization.
  • Is it just me or does the middle click wear out more quickly than the others? Always figured they use a worse switch because they think people use them less. My last two failed the same way.

  • Nintendo is erasing its history - The war against ROMS
  • They've also locked N64 and GBA behind an extra subscription model on the Switch. I've paid a month here and there for online support, I don't want an entire year AND paying double to play one or two retro games.

  • After you die, your Steam games will be stuck in legal limbo
  • You seem to be missing my point, it is very clear what Valve thinks about this. It's literally the article above? And I get their point, but I'm arguing they don't have a legal leg to stand on.

    In the EU there is legal precedent to give access to every account of a deceased person to their next of kin. T&C doesn't mean shit when it goes against consumer protection or civil laws.

    When the T&C say you have to give your kidney to Gabe Newell it won't hold up in court.

  • After you die, your Steam games will be stuck in legal limbo
  • I'm sorry but you're wrong, DRM is about the management of legal access to digital content (literally Digital Rights Management). Essentially a way to check if you have paid for the content you're about to consume, and because protecting the copyrights to digital works is inherently almost impossible, it also tries to prevent unauthorised copies.

    Blurays have DRM, they can only be used by a reader with a correct certification, which only gets that if they have implemented HDCP among other specs. I own my blurays and will happily pass them on to the next generation.

    But sure, give it your own meaning so you can witchhunt lmao

  • After you die, your Steam games will be stuck in legal limbo
  • What the fuck are you on about, when I take something out of my personal library at home it absolutely belongs to me.

    You obviously have no idea what you're talking about. DRM is copy and piracy protection and was never a way to lease a game instead of buying. DRM free means you can copy it to anyones PC and will work fine.

  • After you die, your Steam games will be stuck in legal limbo
  • Excuse the pun but I'm not buying it lmao, half of my Steam library I bought in a physical store and had no fine print indicating I wasn't actually "buying" the game. Steam might try a rugpull people but you cannot go against civil law common law, they might force you into a contract but at least where I live they wouldn't have a leg to stand on.

    Edit: My law courses were not in English

  • After you die, your Steam games will be stuck in legal limbo
  • A service cannot define stipulations that go against civil law common law, even with when agreeing to "T&C". When you buy something in a store and then later they go "nono you didn't actually buy it", that is selling under false pretense.

    I don't believe it was.

    What are you talking about ofcourse it was, and GOG launched 5-6 years later then Steam. When Steam was launched it was marketed as your library of games made as convenient as possible. You lock yourself into our platform and we'll provide you with many tools like cloudsaves, chat system and online services like Xfire all-in-one, and even when you lose your CD's, the game is tied to your account, not a physical CD.

  • After you die, your Steam games will be stuck in legal limbo
  • They need to make up their minds. Yes or no question, when I buy something on steam, do I own it or am I leasing it? I've been buying there under the presumption it was the digital equivalence of buying CD's like I used to. That was how it was sold to me, and the law is very clear about transferring possessions after ones passing.

  • ✨️ Finish him. ✨️
  • He's clearly taking the "but it's better for human kind" stand, which I support with all I can. But academics can be guilty of gatekeeping and being pretentious, which I've seen by many lmao

  • Has the API finally been shut down?
  • Yep. I kept baconreader installed with an API patch so when I click on a reddit link I didn't have to interact with their horrible interface, earlier this week I clicked one and the app still worked, now it doesn't. When I was switching being able to continue using my app was a godsend, now I won't even bother with changing my User-Agent lmao.

  • papers.ssrn.com Zero Progress on Zero Days: How the Last Ten Years Created the Modern Spyware Market

    Spyware makes surveillance simple. The last ten years have seen a global market emerge for ready-made software that lets governments surveil their citizens and

    Abstract

    Spyware makes surveillance simple. The last ten years have seen a global market emerge for ready-made software that lets governments surveil their citizens and foreign adversaries alike and to do so more easily than when such work required tradecraft. The last ten years have also been marked by stark failures to control spyware and its precursors and components. This Article accounts for and critiques these failures, providing a socio-technical history since 2014, particularly focusing on the conversation about trade in zero-day vulnerabilities and exploits. Second, this Article applies lessons from these failures to guide regulatory efforts going forward. While recognizing that controlling this trade is difficult, I argue countries should focus on building and strengthening multilateral coalitions of the willing, rather than on strong-arming existing multilateral institutions into working on the problem. Individually, countries should focus on export controls and other sanctions that target specific bad actors, rather than focusing on restricting particular technologies. Last, I continue to call for transparency as a key part of oversight of domestic governments' use of spyware and related components.

    Keywords: cybersecurity, zero-day vulnerabilities, international law, espionage

    PDF

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    Facebook opened its doors to researchers. What they found paints a complicated picture of social media and echo chambers

    www.nbcnews.com Facebook opened its doors to researchers. What they found paints a complicated picture of social media and echo chambers.

    The project included 17 academic researchers from 12 universities who were granted deep access by Facebook to aggregated data.

    Facebook opened its doors to researchers. What they found paints a complicated picture of social media and echo chambers.

    > The project included 17 academic researchers from 12 universities who were granted deep access by Facebook to aggregated data.

    > July 27, 2023, 8:00 PM CEST > By Brandy Zadrozny

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