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InitialsDiceBearhttps://github.com/dicebear/dicebearhttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/„Initials” (https://github.com/dicebear/dicebear) by „DiceBear”, licensed under „CC0 1.0” (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/)TH
themoken @startrek.website
Posts 3
Comments 98
Sid Meier’s Civilization VII - Official Teaser Trailer
  • Surprised to see the opinions on V/VI not being as good. I've played every interation of this game and they all brought something to the table. VI and the districting gameplay added a lot to the game. One unit per tile in V also made combat more tactical than doom stacking around.

    The big thing I'd like in a new one is less cheaty AI. It's just so boring that winning on Deity is basically exploiting AI foibles instead of... you know, building a stronger nation on an even keel. At the highest difficulty AI should get no bonuses but still be really good at playing the game.

  • Wake me up when September starts
  • I recently (2020) played BG1 and 2 with their expansions and on the one hand you're right... But on the other getting the same story with 10x the graphics and some modern QoL would be great. Reaching BG3's massive audience - that isn't all 90s nostalgia gamers - with a story that's new-to-them would really help cement it in the same way BG2 did for BG1.

  • Paramount and Skydance agree to terms of a merger deal
  • I don't hate this. Seems like Skydance has less conflict of interest (i.e. alternative franchises) than the Warner Brothers merger talks from December. Remains to be seen if this is a good thing from a Trek point of view but... Could be worse.

  • Baldur’s Gate 3 mod support is coming in September
  • It's easier to release tools for a map based game with no real story. Devs have tools to create content, of course, but making something (tools, APIs) safe and logical enough for the public to consume is a task that can easily get backburnered on the way to release.

  • Intel’s Anti-Upgrade Tricks Defeated With Kapton Tape
  • They don't, but they define the socket the processor slots into and probably did this to market the newer chips as more advanced than they are (by bundling a minor chip upgrade with an additional chipset upgrade that may have more uplift).

    I see no other reason to kneecap upgrades like this when upgrading entails the consumer buying more of your product.

  • Linux and DOOM (1993)
  • John Carmack, author of the Doom engine, is a long time Linux user and for a while the policy was to open source the idTech engines once they had moved on.

    However, Doom was hugely popular on its own before this, and was actually more pivotal for making Windows a gaming platform (over DOS).

    The reason it runs everywhere is a combination of it's huge popularity, it's (now) open source and it's generally low system requirements.

  • The RTS genre will never be mainstream unless you change it until it's 'no longer the kind of RTS that I want to play,' says Crate Entertainment CEO
  • That review is bullshit. It's not going to tax your machine, but that's a good thing. The unit type thing is also missing that not the entire game takes place on the battlefield, there's multiple layers to it and you almost never win through pure domination.

    EDIT: Also, ground vehicles? This is Dune, you can't cross sand in a vehicle, and they couldn't go up cliffs. No, instead you airdrop, which is way more flexible.

  • someone tell them
  • Honestly, with Flatpak and immutable base systems this is a place Linux is really excelling now too. Being able to show a novice user a shared package manager with a search and a bunch of common apps and them actually install/remove them in a safe manner with a high likelihood they'll work out of the box (since they come with all their deps in sync independent from distro) is kinda huge.

  • Linux for Kids?
  • One thing I'd like to suggest is get most of their forward facing apps as Flatpak and let them install software that way instead of using the system package manager (even if it has a GUI). This jibes with others suggesting an immutable base system.

    Obviously this may be more of a concern for older kids, but my kid started with Linux and it did fine... Right up until Discord started breaking because it was too old and they didn't want to tangle with the terminal. Same thing when Minecraft started updating Java versions. Discord and Prismlauncher from Flatpak (along with Proton and Steam now) would have kept them happier with Linux.

    As for internet, routers come with parental controls these days too, which have the added advantage of being able to cover phones (at least while not on mobile data). Setting the Internet to be unavailable for certain devices after a certain time on school nights may be a more straightforward route than DE tools.

  • Supreme leader mad
  • For kernel dev it would be a disaster, there's too much implicit action, and abstractions that have unknown runtime cost. The classic answer is that everyone uses 10% of its features over C, but nobody can agree on which 10%.

    As someone forced to get up to date with C++ recently, at this point it's a language in full identity crisis. It wants so badly to be Rust, but it's got decades of baggage it's dragging along.

  • Valve made the right decision
  • In a world where Valve controls 90% of what is running on a device with immutable / containerized images, yeah I think Arch makes a lot more sense. A distro focused on rolling release is a lot less likely to hang you up when you choose to update.

    Debian is great, but depending on where you are in the release cycle it can be a pain in the ass to stay up to date and, frankly, the last time I ran it, shit like apt/dpkg configuration and so many /etc files and structures just felt like mis-features or too complex for their own good.

  • www.mlb.com Dodgers get their ace, agree to $325M deal with Yamamoto (source)

    The winter of the Dodgers keeps rolling on, with Los Angeles agreeing to a deal with Yoshinobu Yamamoto, the top ace on the market, a source told MLB.com's Mark Feinsand. The contract is for 12 years and is worth $325 million, per a source. The team has not confirmed the

    Dodgers get their ace, agree to $325M deal with Yamamoto (source)
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    www.mlb.com Dodgers get their ace, agree to $325M deal with Yamamoto (source)

    The winter of the Dodgers keeps rolling on, with Los Angeles agreeing to a deal with Yoshinobu Yamamoto, the top ace on the market, a source told MLB.com's Mark Feinsand. The contract is for 12 years and is worth $325 million, per a source. The team has not confirmed the

    Dodgers get their ace, agree to $325M deal with Yamamoto (source)
    6
    www.usatoday.com Shohei Ohtani, Dodgers agree on 10-year, $700 million deal

    Shohei Ohtani announced on his Instagram account Saturday that he was signing with the Los Angeles Dodgers, a 10-year deal worth $700 million.

    Shohei Ohtani, Dodgers agree on 10-year, $700 million deal
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