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sping @lemmy.sdf.org
Posts 4
Comments 241
A pediatric doctor on a bike died
  • So many people just can't understand this. In dense city streets your journey times are usually decided by how long you spend waiting in queues and barely affected at all by your top speed. Which is why you can get around a city by bike faster than by car, even though few transportation riders cruise at much more than ~16mph/25kph on the flat.

    I used to think that people just hadn't thought this through and realized it, but I've had a few online discussions where it's clear some people are just flat out incapable of understanding that when there's congestion, speeding to a traffic queue most often just means a longer wait in the queue, not a shorter journey time.

  • EDitor wars
  • it always entertains me when a vim aficionado regurgitates the "just missing a good editor" joke, given that one of the editors Emacs offers is a pretty comprehensive clone of vim.

    (personally, I never had any problem with the default editor when I migrated to it from vi, though I was using a keyboard that already had ctrl next to a.)

  • EDitor wars
  • I really f'ing love Emacs, and... this is true. I'm still constantly learning, 3 decades in.

    But that's part of its appeal - it's a constantly evolving, you tweak and modify it for your needs, and you grow and change together.

  • customize syntax highlighting rules for certain keywords?
  • Pretty much unrelated AFAIK. At least in the setup I have it does mean that various hooks you may have set up may have to be tweaked. e.g. I had things on python-mode-hook but now I have to use python-ts-mode-hook.

    For me it was

    • install tree-sitter (sudo apt install lib-tree-sitter-dev)
    • build Emacs with tree-sitter
    • configure tree-sitter with the snippet below
    • mess with some config/hooks because my prog modes are now different

    Some setups seem to make <lang>-ts-mode somehow aliased to <lang>-mode, and I don't know if that makes the hook issue automatically resolved (?). Apart from that, treesit-auto seemed to be a low-friction way to get a setup:

    My config:

    (use-package treesit-auto
      :custom
      (treesit-auto-install 'prompt)
      (treesit-font-lock-level 4)
      :config
      (treesit-auto-add-to-auto-mode-alist 'all)
      (global-treesit-auto-mode))
    

    Edit: and I can confirm that treesitter does fix your specific problem, unsurprisingly.

  • do you use the default keybinding of Emacs?
  • I came from vi, and use Emacs keys. This was quite some time ago so there weren't hoards of people telling me modal was superior and I should miss it, so I didn't. I don't think anything about it is more "kinda weird" than vi modal editing - just unfamiliar (as vi/vim once was), especially if you're not familiar with standard readline cursor control as also used in OS X.

    we can’t even vi" or ci" in emacs

    You should perhaps explain what this is and why it's essential. Funny to complain that you need a package for multiple cursors; people more often complain there's too much built into Emacs by default. It's easy to add though.

    The long and the short of it is, if you persist in trying to use familiar vim workflows in Emacs, you're swimming against the tide. More productive is to try to use Emacs in its own terms. Many vim->Emacs people persistently get hung up on basically "I find it awkward to use this vim workflow in Emacs", and of course they do. It's equally awkward to try to use Emacs workflows in vim.

  • 3 years and 35+kg later, my Gene Café finally (kinda) paid for itself!
  • While this sounds superior in most respects to the popcorn popper roasting I have done, I can't say it sounds a compelling step up for the expense. I periodically wonder about getting a roaster but I think it's going to take more benefits to finally tempt me.

    The popcorn is crude but simple and trouble free. I've convinced myself to actually appreciate a few minutes outside gently shaking it while looking at the trees. Perhaps I can fit variable control and get a temp probe and get a bit more sophisticated but retain the cheap simplicity.

  • Is there a better way to browse man pages?
  • Sorry it's not a very direct answer but this is one of the many things that make Emacs such a comfortable environment once you're used to it, which takes ... a while.

    There is a man command and then of course it's just more text displayed so you can search and narrow and highlight etc. in the same way you do with any other text. Plus of course there are a few trivial bonuses like links to other man pages being clickable.

    It's all text and Emacs is a text manipulation framework (that naturally includes some editors).

  • Installing CH340 drivers in Linux Mint running 5.15.0-88 kernel
  • You don't execute C source files. They have to be compiled.

    First point as someone else commented, that driver is already present in any mainstream kernel. It's very unlikely you have any need to build it.

    But if you really want to build it the command will be make that will get instructions from Makefile on how to build the driver. But there will be other tools and libraries needed.

  • The hunt for the most efficient heat pump in the world
  • Well all conventional air conditioners are strictly heat pumps, but when we say heat pump everyone usually means bi-directional heat pumps - ones that can provide heating as well as cooling. My Amazon results are not that and I was recently reading about them coming to market starting at $2k.

  • Why do you still hate Windows?
  • Same. I'm a little embarrassed that I have little idea what it's like. Last one I used daily was Windows 7. But then I wonder

    how convenient it all was and how was missing so many things

    What are these things I'm missing?

  • Aeropress has easily become my favourite way to brew coffee ☕
  • Seems very much personal taste, that spans a wide range these days.

    On suggestions from YouTube I tried 20+g coarse with low volume and temperature based on competition winning recipes and hated it. No body, thin and unsatisfying.

    So I'm back to 12-15g medium, inverted, add some 90-95C water and stir out the fizz, then up to 180g water or so. Heavy repeated agitation early on, after maybe 60s uninvert for a gentle plunge. Usually dilute a little with some cold, drink black.

    I checked the brew temp and full boil gives 96C in the press. I often do 200F 93C on the kettle for about 90 in the press. Sometimes I just boil and add a splash of cold.

    My beans are medium roast - city+, no oiliness. I like pretty trad rich coffee and hate thin acidic tea like brews. Tea makes better tea than coffee does IMO. But I also hate acrid flat bitterness of dark roasts.

  • Why do the vast majority of romantic comedies depict people who are wealthy?
  • Yeah, the whole observation needed the adjective American.

    Long so I noticed US soaps we're all wealthy people being miserable, while British soaps were all working class people being miserable, but Australian soaps were all working-class people being happy (after resolving some minor difficult situation).

  • Somerville, MA @lemmy.world sping @lemmy.sdf.org

    OpenStreetMap and GraphHopper appreciation...

    www.openstreetmap.org OpenStreetMap

    OpenStreetMap is a map of the world, created by people like you and free to use under an open license.

    Well someone has to post something to this Somerville Community... So it has to be something about the community path obviously...

    Google maps is always rubbish for bicycle navigation, but OpenStreetMap offers three different navigation systems for bikes, all of which are better. I'm most impressed with GraphHopper - 3 days into the community path opening will happily route you down the new path. It doesn't seem to know about the High School diversion, but that's realtively minor.

    Its route for me to get to the Seaport from near Davis is pretty much what I would choose.

    0

    No nonsense city brute is actually a sweet and rapid ride

    This is my rescued Marin Hamilton, that over the years has evolved into a modern take on the old English 3-speed. My former commuter was stolen, and at the same time this appeared, broken, rusty, and abandoned on the same office bike rack (coincidence?). I saved it before the office management sent it to the trash, and got it on the road again.

    The wheel bearing races were pitted from rusty neglect and I find SS awkward in the urban stop-start, so after a failed experiment with an SRAM Automatix 2-speed hub I fitted a Sturmey Archer 3 speed. 3rd is a single-speed ratio, 1 & 2 are for hills and setting off. It's a sweet setup for my area and usage, and is almost as robust and low maintenance as SS.

    A transportation bike needs fenders (Velo Orange Zeppelins - excellent, effective, silent). The original fork rang like a tuning fork on braking no matter what brakes or pads, so I got a $40 Marin fork off Ebay and converted the front to disk, and put on generator lighting at the same time.

    And just now it got some luxury new tires - Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 700x50 on the label, but are actually 43mm, in typical Schwalbe fashion. Great tires though - light and fast and grippy and durable and puncture resistant.

    It's a fast and comfortable city bomber. I have a little TSDZ2 motor and battery that I fit each year for commuting the hottest summer months, and then in winter it gets studs to get me through the ice and slush. For fairer weather riding I have a very similar derailleur bike and the pair of them get me around nicely.

    4

    If you build it, they will come

    In Cambridge, MA, USA, and nearby communities, bike advocates have made real progress with lanes and paths and general infrastructure. Also the city requires that new builds have a proper bike room. This building was recently gutted and fitted out and this is the bike room today - overloaded, and the building is barely half full... Looks like they will need to find more efficient bike racks!

    Meanwhile in a recent commute I was in a queue of 30 bicycles at a light at which about 6-8 cars get through at a time. 10-15 years ago I was one of the few bikes on the roads at any time.

    Hats off to the advocates and representatives of the local cities that have made this happen through continuous pressure and work over decades...

    28

    Is anyone working on a Lemmy client for Emacs?

    The lack of keyboard interface on Lemmy is killing me, but really what I want is a good client in Emacs. However, it's beyond my Elisp to design and start such a project, but I could probably help. Anyone on it?

    27