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neatchee @lemmy.world
Posts 3
Comments 445
Why in 2024 do people still believe in religion? (serious)
  • I'm an effort to get you an answer that isn't dismissive:

    1. Youth indoctrination, social conformity, and cultural isolation. If your parents, friends, and most of your community tells you something is true, you are unlikely to challenge it for a variety of reasons including trust (most of what they've taught you works for your daily life), tribal identity, etc

    2. People naturally fear death, and one coping strategy for the existential fear of death is to convince yourself that the death of your body is not the end of your existence. Science does not provide a pathway to this coping strategy so people will accept or create belief systems that quell that fear, even in the face of contradictory evidence. Relieving the pressure of that fear is a strong motivator.

    3. Release of responsibility. When there is no higher power to dictate moral absolutes, we are left feeling responsible for the complex decisions around what is or isn't the appropriate course of action. And that shit is complicated and often anxiety inducing. Many people find comfort in offloading that work to a third party.

  • I don't want to form parasocial relationships with people I fap to
  • Hmmm. I want to push back on this a bit....

    We can all recognize deeply, egregiously unhealthy parasocial relationships, so I'm not going to bother talking about those.

    But there are plenty of what I would call parasocial relationships the track back quite a long time in human history that I think are completely normal.

    Take, for example, the famous athlete. If you find a particular athlete to be your favorite, and you watch their interviews whenever they're available, and you get excited when they get paid a bunch of money in a trade, that's a low-key parasocial relationship. Maybe you even send them regular fan mail, cheering them on when they do well or consoling them when they do poorly. You are invested in their life without reciprocity, and find joy and value in simply observing their existence.

    There are lots of actors and actress that we love to love, where many people have formed a parasocial relationship: Tom Hanks and Keanu Reeves are two that come to mind.

    These are situations that go beyond "yeah I'm a fan" and into feeling some level of investment in their success. It doesn't have to be extreme.

    I think, as with many things, there are healthy ways to engage in parasocial relationships in moderation. It becomes a problem when it becomes detrimental to your daily life, especially if it begins to replace other forms of human interaction. If it's just a thing you enjoy on top of other, more typical relationships, them IMO there's nothing wrong with that.

  • And here I thought only Newshour was covering the trial on PBS...
  • Fun fact: the number of laughs the count does is always equal to the number he's counting. So here are the missing 31 AHs for everyone's enjoyment!

    AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH AH

  • And please write your apology as detailed as possible at the prompt.
  • Yeah, hasn't that person seen the incredibly accurate journalistic masterpiece documentary "Weird: The Al Yankovich Story"?

    I don't think he's seen the 100% true film, using only authentic footage from his life, "Weird: The Al Yankovich Story" 😮

  • It is apparently controversial
  • Yikes. That's a while lot of words just to show exactly how much you are part of the problem.

    This isn't about you. It was never about you. Your desire to pivot this to a class issue is some hardcore mansplaining. Get over yourself and listen to victims instead of thinking you know better than everyone.

  • Dark Brandon strikes again!
  • I think it's the same appeal as The Onion. It's satire. The best part of The Onion is reading the headline before the URL. I don't take stuff like this as a sincere attempt to make the alleged author look good. It's too far-fetched for that.

    The common thread of all comedy is the unexpected. In this case, it's the "haha if only this were real, that would be great" element that makes it funny

  • It is apparently controversial
  • You think most adults were 100lbs heavier than me at 18?

    Bruh, based on your criteria I had until maybe 15 at the latest and then only for men on the larger end of the spectrum.

    Fact is, my family was kind and loving, I associated with other families that were equally so, I went to a private school with caring, supportive teachers, and I was certainly never left alone with someone my parents didn't know well.

    Whether it happened a handful of times I can't say, but I certainly have no memory of it until my mid to late teens when I started spending most of my time with people of my own accord and took more risks.

    I was truly blessed to grow up the way I did. I'm sorry you didn't have the same