Skip Navigation
InitialsDiceBearhttps://github.com/dicebear/dicebearhttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/„Initials” (https://github.com/dicebear/dicebear) by „DiceBear”, licensed under „CC0 1.0” (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/)BO
boatswain @infosec.pub
Posts 2
Comments 271
A StarCraft gaming tournament took place 10 years ago and these were the prizes teams could win
  • 10 years ago would have been 2014; at that point 25 Bitcoin would be a good chunk of cash:

    The price of bitcoin opened the year at $770, according to the CoinDesk Price Index. By mid-December, it was trading in the mid-$300 range. This represents a drop of more than 50% from the start of the year.

    It'd be interesting to know when this was actually from; it's a great screenshot even without the exact details, though.

  • CrowdStrike’s faulty update crashed 8.5 million Windows devices, says Microsoft
  • A coworker of mine has worked with CrowdStrike in the past; I haven't. He said that the releases he was familiar with from them in the past were all staged into groups and customers were encouraged to test internally before applying them; not sure if this is a different product or what, but it seems like a big step backwards of what he's saying is right.

  • Is cake a sort of bread?
  • Yeah, that's much different than the brown bread my family calls Irish soda bread. Here's the recipe:

    • ½ lb./225g whole wheat flour (1-3/4 c.)
    • 3 oz./75g unbleached white flour (2/3 c.)
    • 1½ oz./40g porridge oatlets (3 heaping Tbsp.)     (steel cut oatmeal or John McCann--in a tin)
    • 1½ oz./40g  wheat bran (1 c.)
    • 1½ oz./40g wheat germ (1/2 c.)
    • ½ tsp. baking soda
    • ½ tsp. salt
    • 1 pint/600 ml buttermilk (2-1/8 to 2-1/3 c.)
    1. Preheat a cool oven, 300ºF/150ºC/Gas mark 2.
    2. Grease and flour a 2 lb./900g loaf tin (I use an 8-1/2 x 4-1/2 x 2-5/8 inch bread pan).
    3. Mix all the dry ingredients together thoroughly.  Then, add them to the buttermilk and mix quickly to make a wet dough (I have found it better to use only 500 ml or 2-1/8 c. buttermilk).  Turn into loaf pan and bake in the preheated oven on the very bottom shelf for 2 to 2-1/4 hrs.  When cooked, the bread will shrink from the pan slightly and sound hollow when rapped on the bottom with the knuckles.
  • Is cake a sort of bread?
  • When I make it it's much wetter than that and definitely needs to to poured into a bread pan. This is for Irish Brown Bread, not for the white flour soda bread with currants and whatnot.

  • If anyone ever asks you about sails
  • Interesting! I can't actually say on that one; to me, "spanking" sounds like an old fashioned intensifier I've heard "brand spanking new" a few times, which feels like the same kind of use. As to whether that has anything to do with the sail, I'm not sure. It looks like the sail itself was introduced in the late 18th century; in Seamanship in the Age of Sail, John Harland reports that one William Nicholson complains about the new sail design in a book of his in 1792. That's the closest I can get to origin of the term.

  • If anyone ever asks you about sails
  • I've never heard of a "gallant," just a "top gallant" (usually "t'gallant," sometimes "gans'l"). I've sailed on ships with split t'gallants, though. I did sail on one ship with a skys'l, never a moonraker; I suspect those are both terms for "a sail above the royal".

  • If anyone ever asks you about sails
  • A ton of work and attention went into that film to keep it historically accurate, even down to assigning all the extras to watches and figuring out what the watch rotation would be and who would be on duty at any given time.

  • If anyone ever asks you about sails
  • FYI the red ones are studding sails, often called stu'nsails because sailors love leaving off letters (like how "boatswain" is often called "bosun"). Also, jibs are staysails; staysails are any sail that slides up and down a stay, which are the pieces of standing rigging that support the masts from the front and the back.

  • Left hand keypad with D pad and scroll wheel?

    Hi all, I recently got into the world of ergo mech by borrowing a friend's old Iris v2, and I really love how powerful and customizable things can be with QMK firmware.

    Recently, my old n52te has started to show signs of age after a dozen or so years of abuse. If you're not familiar, they look like this: !

    There's definitely stuff that could be improved on--just being able to build your own firmware for it would be amazing. Having one or two more thumb buttons for layers would be sweet as well.

    The community of ergo mech keyboard builders are doing some super cool things with 3d printed builds and all kinds of neat stuff. Since I've just been dipping my toes in, my question is: does anyone know of any good replacements for my n52te? Is this something anyone has tried tinkering around with?

    Thanks!

    18

    5e: Playing with Ancestral Weapons

    I'm trying to figure out the best way to deal with some homebrew stuff I'll be dealing with in my 5e campaign.

    If you're not familiar with Ancestral Weapons, it's a pretty cool system that gives you the ability to have weapons that level up with your players. The players get points periodically that they can spend on upgrades to their weapons.

    I'll be using a variation of this setup in my campaign, and I'm trying to figure out the best way to do so. My initial thought was a scene for each character's weapon, with some Monk's Active Tiles to handle a "talent tree" kind of interface where a player could select and then lock in which powers they want.

    That doesn't really take care of updating the item itself though, which means that the players would have to update things manually ("oh, I need to make this sword +2 now" for example) after using the scene as a kind of calculator.

    So maybe there's a better way: make the weapons Actors of their own, with special character sheets or something? Or maybe there's an existing mod I can use? Any thoughts or suggestions on the best way forward are appreciated.

    1