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TheGrandNagus @lemmy.world
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Verstappen will stop competing in simracing late at nights before Grands Prix, says Marko
  • Oh he's certainly one of the best ever. I'd never dispute that. I can't really name anybody else on the grid capable of seriously going against Lewis over the course of a season.

    But the Red Bull has went from the most dominant car ever to second best, with the Mercedes in a not too far behind 3rd (certainly good enough to compete depending on the track)

    Max has stated that the car now needs his complete concentration otherwise it's easy to lose control, whereas last season and early this season it was on rails and just did what you wanted it to do.

    I think that if he was tired (and I know I would be if I stayed up doing competitive sim-racing past 2 in the morning!), it'd be a lot more noticeable in his current car than in last year's (or early season this year's) car, because he has to be more "on the limit", so-to-speak, in order to get a good result.

  • Why preventing long-term sickness in the UK is an economic necessity
  • In fact there was a lot of news about people being better off out of work rather than in work.

    That doesn't really line up with new Labour achieving (at the time) record levels of employment, nor does it line up with the data on the amount of people claiming sickness absence: source (ONS)

    As you can see, it fell from a rate of 3% in 1997 to 2.2% in 2010. It never increased under Labour.

    Now, in fairness, it did drop to 1.8% for the Tories, but once COVID hit, the backlogs created for the NHS (in significant part due to the deterioration of the NHS), we have been unable to bounce back quickly.

    The data also shows 184 million days were lost in 1997, which labour got down to 132 million in 2010. It remained stagnant under the Tories, then ramped up after Covid.

    Seems to me like Labour were massively successful in reducing sickness leave.

    In fact there was a lot of news about people being better off out of work rather than in work.

    So coming back to this, tbh (to me) that sounds like it could be the usual bashing of benefits "scroungers". The data doesn't back it up, people just thought Labour's generous benefits was making everyone be lazy, facts be damned.

  • Verstappen will stop competing in simracing late at nights before Grands Prix, says Marko
  • Is it? I'd say we don't really know.

    Yeah he did a couple where he won easily the day after. But he was also in literally the most dominant F1 car of all time at that point. He barely had to push at all.

    Perez sailed to 2nd in the WDC in that car. A man regularly outqualified by Logan Sargent now...

    The most recent time he didn't have that advantage. He was irritated (to put it mildly lmao), error prone, and dangerous. Then the way he went on after the race was completely unhinged.

    Lapses of concentration and irritability are pretty synonymous with lack of good sleep. I don't think it's that unreasonable to ask "was he tired?" considering he was up awake and actively competing well past 2 in the morning. Max is human, and that sounds like something that would make almost anybody tired the next day.

  • This is why people should stop recommending Arch. Fedora or Opensuse TW should be recommended instead for new people.
  • They aren't, no. But SUSE has continued working with MS, and many of the people that were there are still there.

    Perhaps their close relationship is an irrational thing to point at in the current year. Perhaps it isn't. I don't really know tbh.

    But it's certainly something some people are still a bit iffy about. And I'm sure some people will still be similarly iffy about RedHat in 10 years too for their recent licencing controversy.

  • This is why people should stop recommending Arch. Fedora or Opensuse TW should be recommended instead for new people.
  • I'd disagree with that, mostly.

    The media codecs is bloody annoying, yes. Sure it's only a command or two, but it really should just be a tickbox in the installer like it is on, say, Ubuntu. So big agreement there.

    As for the Flatpak repo, Fedora switched to Flathub as the default a while ago. IIRC it only doesn't if you choose to have no non-foss software during the installation (in which case of course you'd expect to not get full Flathub access!)

    I think Fedora is an overall pretty great distro for beginners aside from their media codecs bone-headedness and their god-awful installer (which is getting replaced).

  • This is why people should stop recommending Arch. Fedora or Opensuse TW should be recommended instead for new people.
  • SUSE also has multiple controversial pacts with Microsoft, and has for a long time. Such as the Novell-Microsoft agreement.

    There was a time when it looked possible that MS was going to sue lots of Linux projects, and SUSE immediately jumped into a cosy relationship with MS so that if it did happen, they'd be shielded. This was interpreted as a fuck you to other FOSS projects by much of the community. (Was a long time ago though)

  • Capacitive controls could be the cause of a spate of VW ID.4 crashes
  • Thankfully, after every reviewer called them bullshit, their newer cars have shifted back to real buttons on the wheel.

    There's still capacitive button BS for the heating controls though, so there's still shit reviewers need to push back on.

  • Why preventing long-term sickness in the UK is an economic necessity
  • The last Labour government

    • had an NHS waiting list that was in the region of hours, not weeks.

    • over doubled NHS funding

    • presided over the NHS having it's fastest increase in spending in its history

    • built a shitload of new NHS facilities and expanded capacity

    • had NHS staff that were paid way more fairly and didn't experience the extreme burnout we're seeing now

    • massively improved NHS dentistry

    • presided over the highest NHS satisfaction rating in its history

    • had what the WHO and others cited as being the best overall healthcare system on the planet

    I'm not saying it was perfect. The IT system overhaul was a bit of a flop, for example. But Labour left the NHS in the best state it has ever been in.

    I don't see how you could look at Labour and the Conservatives on health and say "both parties are the same"

  • First Pop!_OS 24.04 Alpha with COSMIC DE Drops on August 8 - OMG! Ubuntu
  • Yeah.

    Don't get me wrong I guess I'm glad to see a bit more diversity in the DE space, but the design of cosmic has always been "Gnome but a bit dated and uglier" to me.

    Still, theming exists despite the quirks it can cause sometimes, so it's not the end of the world.

    I'm still going to have a little mess around with it and see what it's like though.

  • South Africa's Sports Minister: "Our first meeting is end of August in Monaco. My term will be a failure if I dont bring F1 to South Africa."
  • Or crime. Especially violent crime.

    For reference, according to the UN Global study on homicide 2019, here's South Africa and a few other countries' knife homicide rates:

    • UK, Monaco (joint lowest): 0.08 per 100k

    • France: 0.2 per 100k

    • Germany: 0.23 per 100k

    • New Zealand: 0.4 per 100k

    • United States: 0.6 per 100k

    • South Africa (hold onto your fucking hats for this one, the highest in the world): 16.95 per 100k

    You are 212x more likely to die from stabbing in South Africa than the UK or Monaco. It's crazy.

  • Keir Starmer gives go-ahead for British 'Storm Shadow' missiles to be used in strikes against targets inside Russia

    news.sky.com Keir Starmer gives go-ahead for British missiles to be used in strikes against targets inside Russia

    The decision over the use of Storm Shadow missiles, which has been welcomed by Ukraine, represents a hawkish shift in policy from the stance taken by the former Conservative government.

    Keir Starmer gives go-ahead for British missiles to be used in strikes against targets inside Russia

    This appears to be a move to counter the UMPK gliding bombs Russia has started using recently to great effect against Ukraine.

    Russia can launch these from Russian soil, safe from Ukrainian fire. These missiles will allow Ukraine to strike grounded planes and weapons stockpiles in Russia.

    It's an interesting move, considering the US has been telling Ukraine not to use any western long-range weapons against Russia directly.

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