Skip Navigation
Steve Steve @communick.news
Posts 7
Comments 698
Giant Pixel 9 leak gives us our first real-world look at the Fold
  • The Fold has a large camera bump to one corner.

  • Giant Pixel 9 leak gives us our first real-world look at the Fold
  • Am I the only one who wants to be able to lay my phone flat?

  • 'Zionist-free zone': Israelis are increasingly unwanted at global tourism sites
  • limiting the leisure options of the people who support those actions becomes morally acceptable

    I would agree.
    But not every resident of a nation supports the actions of their government.

  • 'Zionist-free zone': Israelis are increasingly unwanted at global tourism sites
  • Sure. But that's a different issue. That doesn't require punishing some random citizen; One who has nothing to do with, and no control over what the US, or Israel governments do.

  • 'Zionist-free zone': Israelis are increasingly unwanted at global tourism sites
  • That doesn't answer the question. Is it okay to punish people for something they have no control over?

  • 'Zionist-free zone': Israelis are increasingly unwanted at global tourism sites
  • Punishing unknown people for the actions of their government?
    As a US citizen, this is concerning.

    My government has done all kinds of shit I have no control over, and don't condone.
    Should I be held responsible for any of it?

  • Biden to call for 5% cap on annual rent increases, as he tries to show plans to tame inflation
  • Treating the symptom.
    Okay I guess. I'll get excited when I see a plan to treat the disease.

  • I feel sorry for the orcas.
  • I thought Sea World got rid of all the Orcas after the bad publicity from the movie Blackfish.

  • Dow jumps 300 points to record as Trump survives assassination attempt
  • That's well within the range of normal daily market movement.
    There's literally nothing news worthy here.

  • Tesla Cybertruck gets vandalized by climate activists
  • Did you finish watching that video?

    It has independent rear wheel steering.
    That's the rear wheels turning in, because they're meant to pivot.

  • If everyone is fired by AI, who's going to buy the products and services made by the companies if no one has money anymore?
  • Rents will probably go up [...] and what’s left won’t be enough to save for any kind of down deposit.

    It’s the same capitalism we have now.

    Whatever it does to home and rent prices, as well as inflation generally, would be temporary until the markets adjusts. That can be softened by slowly phasing it in, maybe $100/m each year. The standard supply, demand, price balancing act at play. This time with the income floor not being at $0.

  • If everyone is fired by AI, who's going to buy the products and services made by the companies if no one has money anymore?
  • It's the same capitalism we have now; Accept the bottom income level, isn't zero anymore.

    Who would be in what Cast?
    Where do you draw the lines?

  • Why is the US not considered a third world country?
  • Several reasons.

    1. The US is largely responsible for defining what 1st, 2nd, and 3rd World countries are.
    2. It has the largest economy in the world.
      (I think? That may have gone to China by now. Not sure. But it was true recently.)
    3. Even with everything you said being true. It's still the wealthiest country in the world, by a large margin. Epically when you compare incomes, lifestyles, and infrastructure to actual 3rd world countries. It's not even close.
  • If everyone is fired by AI, who's going to buy the products and services made by the companies if no one has money anymore?
  • I've heard people say a UBI is easy to exploit before.
    But I don't see how.

    If everyone gets the same payment, with the only qualifiers being citizenship and age; How can it be exploited?

  • It’s Too Hot to Fly Helicopters and That’s Killing People
  • It doesn't even sound like a fun idea!
    But I hate the heat.

  • How my family got to Star Trek
  • It would fall under rule 3 I'd think.
    "Never spend more for an acquisition than you have to."

  • I-25 improvements between Comanche and Montgomery to begin next month | News

    www.abqjournal.com I-25 improvements between Comanche and Montgomery to begin next month

    A project aimed at addressing traffic bottlenecks and improving pedestrian and bicycle safety on the Interstate 25 corridor in the middle of Albuquerque will begin soon.

    I-25 improvements between Comanche and Montgomery to begin next month

    Kagi AI Summery: The document announces that improvements to I-25 between Comanche and Montgomery in the United States will begin next month. The improvements will involve work on the interstate highway. The project aims to enhance the road infrastructure in that area. No additional details about the specific nature of the improvements are provided. The document serves as a brief announcement of the upcoming construction project on I-25.

    I didn't expect an AI to point out how little info there is. That's impressively bad for The ABQ Journal. But at least it's a warning of construction that might slow things down.

    1
    grist.org Albuquerque made itself drought-proof. Then its dam started leaking.

    Like Albuquerque, cities across the West rely on fragile water sources — and aging infrastructure.

    Albuquerque made itself drought-proof. Then its dam started leaking.

    Kagi AI Summary: The failure of the El Vado dam in New Mexico has disrupted the water supply for the Albuquerque region, forcing the city and nearby farmers to rely on finite groundwater resources. The dam, which has been collecting irrigation water for nearly a century, is suffering from structural issues that have caused it to be out of commission for the past three summers. This has threatened the water supply for both agriculture and the growing Albuquerque metropolitan area, which had previously reduced its groundwater reliance by importing surface water from the dam. With the dam's future uncertain, the region is struggling to balance its limited water resources and find alternative storage solutions. The challenges facing the El Vado dam highlight the broader water infrastructure issues affecting communities across the drought-stricken American West as climate change exacerbates water scarcity.

    0

    Drive-thrus, tribal consultation and other changes to the city’s zoning code

    citydesk.org Drive-thrus, tribal consultation and other changes to the city’s zoning code - City Desk ABQ

    At their eight-hour meeting Monday, city councilors voted on multiple zoning changes that could impact neighborhoods and businesses, including allowing - City Hall

    Drive-thrus, tribal consultation and other changes to the city’s zoning code - City Desk ABQ

    Kagi AI Highlights:

    • The city council voted on several zoning changes, including allowing tribal representatives to comment on land developments near the Petroglyph National Monument, allowing drive-thrus in certain areas, and creating design standards for developments near the planned Rail Trail.
    • The ordinance allowing tribal representatives to comment on land developments near the Petroglyph National Monument passed unanimously, as it was seen as important to protect sacred tribal lands and cultural resources.
    • The proposal to allow drive-thrus in the Volcano Heights Urban Center was controversial, with the Planning Department and Environmental Planning Commission recommending against it, but it ultimately passed in a 6-3 vote.
    • An ordinance was passed to require development standards like landscape buffering and building design restrictions for properties next to the planned Rail Trail in downtown Albuquerque.
    • The council voted on several amendments to the Integrated Development Ordinance (IDO) Annual Update, including increasing alley lighting, allowing more duplexes, and adjusting fence/wall heights.
    • The amendment to allow duplexes in more residential areas failed in a 3-6 vote, while the amendment to require energy storage systems to meet neighborhood standards passed unanimously.
    • An amendment to have neighborhoods and developers meet after a development is proposed (rather than before) passed 5-4.
    • The amendment to allow tribal representatives to meet with developers about land-related applications passed unanimously.
    • The proposal to increase allowable front yard fence/wall heights to 5 feet failed 1-8.
    • The amendment to allow overnight shelters in certain zones also failed 3-6.
    0

    Albuquerque is throwing out homeless people's belongings

    www.propublica.org Albuquerque Is Throwing Out the Belongings of Homeless People, Violating City Policy

    The city has violated a court order and its own policies by discarding the personal property of thousands of homeless people, who have lost medications, birth certificates, IDs, treasured family photos and the ashes of loved ones.

    Albuquerque Is Throwing Out the Belongings of Homeless People, Violating City Policy

    Kagi AI Summary: Albuquerque, New Mexico has been aggressively clearing homeless encampments, resulting in the loss of personal belongings for thousands of homeless individuals. The city has escalated these efforts despite a court order prohibiting the destruction of unattended possessions. Homeless residents have lost critical items like medication, identification, and survival gear, making it harder for them to find housing and jobs. The city claims it provides notice and resources, but advocates say this is rarely the case. Lawsuits have been filed challenging the city's actions as unconstitutional, but the issue remains unresolved as the city continues its encampment removal program at an accelerated pace.

    2
    citydesk.org How many homeless people are in Albuquerque? - City Desk ABQ

    Teams of volunteers are set to fan out across the city on Tuesday  in an attempt to count Albuquerque’s homeless population. Armed with surveys, volunteers will canvass neighborhoods, alleys, parks, encampments and meal service sites. They’ll count those who are unsheltered and in emergency she...

    How many homeless people are in Albuquerque? - City Desk ABQ

    Kagi AI Summary > The New Mexico Coalition to End Homelessness organizes an annual point-in-time count of the homeless population in Albuquerque. Last year's count found over 2,300 homeless individuals. Volunteers will canvass the city on Tuesday to survey unsheltered people and those in shelters. The count provides data required for federal funding and gives officials a sense of needs. However, it is acknowledged to be an imperfect undercount, as it depends on conditions and willingness to participate. Notably, the 2023 nationwide report found that New Mexico saw the largest increase in homelessness at 57% over the past year, along with high rates of unsheltered veterans and chronic homelessness.

    4

    Restaurant inspections: Rodents, roaches and long fake nails close one New Mexico staple

    Kagi AI Summary: The passage lists the addresses of various food establishments in Albuquerque, New Mexico that have recently been downgraded due to health code violations. Many issues were observed like rodent droppings throughout facilities, food debris built up under kitchen equipment, and employees not properly washing their hands. Major violations included lack of date labeling on food items, food stored at improper temperatures, and chlorine sanitizer buckets lacking test strips. Several restaurants had gaps in external doors and walls allowing pest entry. Overall, the list shows that many popular food locations were cited for health code violations and risks to customers if issues are not addressed properly.

    1

    We’re out! AVANGRID cancels $8.3 billion PNM merger

    abq.news We're out! AVANGRID cancels $8.3 billion PNM merger - The Paper.

    It's official: Global energy giant AVANGRID is walking away from a three-year $8.3 billion plan to acquire New Mexico's largest utility, PNM. For three

    We're out! AVANGRID cancels $8.3 billion PNM merger - The Paper.

    Kagi AI Summary: The merger between PNM Resources and AVANGRID has been officially cancelled after three years of negotiations. While the $8.3 billion deal had overcome initial opposition, the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission ultimately rejected it in 2021 due to concerns raised by advocacy group New Energy Economy. AVANGRID appealed the decision but the court did not rule in time. With the deadline expired at the end of 2023, AVANGRID chose to withdraw from the merger. PNM had proposed extending the agreement until a court decision was made but AVANGRID declined. As a standalone company, PNM remains committed to transitioning to 100% renewable energy for its customers with or without AVANGRID's investment.

    0