Skip Navigation
Cicadas are making so much noise that residents are calling the police in South Carolina
www.cbsnews.com Cicadas are making so much noise that residents are calling the police in South Carolina

"Although to some, the noise is annoying, they pose no danger to humans or pets," the sheriff wrote. "Unfortunately, it is the sounds of nature."

Cicadas are making so much noise that residents are calling the police in South Carolina

Emerging cicadas are so loud in one South Carolina county that residents are calling the sheriff's office asking why they can hear a "noise in the air that sounds like a siren, or a whine, or a roar."

The Newberry County Sheriff's Office sent out a message on Facebook on Tuesday letting people know that the whining sound is just the male cicadas singing to attract mates after more than a decade of being dormant.

Some people have even flagged down deputies to ask what the noise is all about, Newberry County Sheriff Lee Foster said.

The nosiest cicadas were moving around the county of about 38,000 people, about 40 miles northwest of Columbia, prompting calls from different locations as Tuesday wore on, Foster said.

Their collective songs can be as loud as jet engines and scientists who study them often wear earmuffs to protect their hearing.

After Tuesday, Foster understands why.

"Although to some, the noise is annoying, they pose no danger to humans or pets," Foster wrote in his statement to county residents. "Unfortunately, it is the sounds of nature."

13
131 million in U.S. live in areas with unhealthy pollution levels, lung association finds
www.nbcnews.com 131 million in U.S. live in areas with unhealthy pollution levels, lung association finds

The report also found that people in the United States experienced more “very unhealthy” or “hazardous” air quality days than any time in the survey’s history.

131 million in U.S. live in areas with unhealthy pollution levels, lung association finds

The report also found that people in the United States experienced more “very unhealthy” or “hazardous” air quality days than any time in the survey’s history.

Nearly 40% of people in the U.S. are living in areas with unhealthy levels of air pollution and the country is backsliding on clean air progress as the effects of climate change intensify, according to a new report from the American Lung Association.

The organization’s report — its 25th annual analysis of the “State of the Air” in the country — found that between 2020 and 2022, 131 million people were living in areas with unhealthy levels of air pollution. The figure increased by nearly 12 million since the last survey a year ago.

The report also found that people in the United States experienced more “very unhealthy” or “hazardous” air quality days than any time in the survey’s history.

Katherine Pruitt, the national senior director for clean air policy at the American Lung Association, said climate change is chipping away at decades of cleanup efforts made through the Clean Air Act, a federal law passed in 1963 to regulate air pollution and set air quality standards.

Wildfires are a fast-growing pollution source that policymakers are struggling to address. Climate scientists expect wildfire smoke to increase in the future, as greenhouse gas emissions push temperatures higher. The lung association’s analysis comes to the same conclusion as peer-reviewed research published last year in the journal Nature. Marshall Burke, an author of that study, suggested that wildfire smoke has undone about 25% of the Clean Air Act’s progress.

1
New Biden rule would make 4 million white-collar workers eligible for overtime pay
www.usatoday.com New Biden rule would make 4 million white-collar workers eligible for overtime pay

Overtime pay would cover 4 million more workers by January 1 under a new Biden administration rule that boosts the salary threshold for exemption

New Biden rule would make 4 million white-collar workers eligible for overtime pay

The Biden administration on Tuesday announced a new rule that would make millions of white-collar workers newly eligible for overtime pay.

Starting July 1, the rule would increase the threshold at which executive, administrative and professional employees are exempt from overtime pay to $43,888 from the current $35,568. That change would make an additional 1 million workers eligible to receive time-and-a-half wages for each hour they put in beyond a 40-hour week.

On January 1, the threshold would rise further to $58,656, covering another 3 million workers.

“This rule will restore the promise to workers that if you work more than 40 hours in a week, you should be paid for that time,” Acting Labor Secretary Julie Su said in a statement. “So often, lower-paid salaried workers are doing the same job as their hourly counterparts but are spending more time away from their families for no additional pay. This is unacceptable.”

4
Arizona Democrats attempt to repeal the state’s 19th century abortion ban
apnews.com Arizona Democrats attempt to repeal the state’s 19th century abortion ban

Republicans have used procedural votes to block earlier repeal efforts.

Arizona Democrats attempt to repeal the state’s 19th century abortion ban

For a third straight week, Democrats at the Arizona Legislature are attempting Wednesday to repeal the state’s near-total ban on abortions, again spotlighting an issue that has put Republicans on the defensive in a battleground state for the presidential election.

Republicans have used procedural votes to block earlier repeal efforts, each time drawing condemnation from Democratic President Joe Biden, who has made his support for abortion access central to his campaign for reelection.

Arizona Republicans have been under intense pressure from some conservatives in their base, who firmly support the abortion ban, even as it’s become a liability with swing voters who will decide crucial races including the presidency, the U.S. Senate and the GOP’s control of the Legislature.

1
Maine lawmakers approve shield law for providers of abortion and gender-affirming care
www.pbs.org Maine lawmakers approve shield law for providers of abortion and gender-affirming care

If signed by Democratic Gov. Janet Mills, Maine would join more than a dozen states that shield medical providers and others from out-of-state investigations regarding abortions.

Maine lawmakers approve shield law for providers of abortion and gender-affirming care

The Democratic-controlled Maine Legislature gave final approval Friday to a bill that would protect health care workers who provide abortion and gender-affirming care from legal action brought in other states.

If signed by Democratic Gov. Janet Mills, Maine would join more than a dozen states that shield medical providers and others from out-of-state investigations regarding abortions. Republican were firmly against the bill to shield against out-of-state lawsuits.

The Maine Senate voted 21-13 on Friday, a day after a 76-67 vote in the House.

The votes came after attorneys general in 16 states, including Tennessee, threatened legal action if Maine proceeded with a shield law preventing out-of-state repercussions for those who provide abortions and what they described as “gender transition surgeries for children.”

3
N.C. report finds wilderness camp failed to ensure boy was breathing before he died
www.nbcnews.com N.C. report finds wilderness camp failed to ensure boy was breathing before he died

A state inspection report offers new details on the hours leading up to a 12-year-old’s death at Trails Carolina, a camp for troubled adolescents.

N.C. report finds wilderness camp failed to ensure boy was breathing before he died

A state inspection report offers new details on the hours leading up to a 12-year-old’s death at Trails Carolina, a camp for troubled adolescents.

Staff at a North Carolina wilderness therapy camp failed to check that a 12-year-old boy was breathing during his first night at the facility, a state report released Tuesday found.

The boy, who has been identified in law enforcement records only by his initials, CJH, was found unresponsive around 7:45 a.m. on Feb. 3 at Trails Carolina, a camp for troubled adolescents in the western part of the state.

17
Two Turning Point USA members admit to assaulting queer professor
www.theguardian.com Two Turning Point USA members admit to assaulting queer professor

Kalen D’Almeida and Braden Ellis accosted David Boyles, also co-founder of Drag Story Hour Arizona, last October

Two Turning Point USA members admit to assaulting queer professor

Kalen D’Almeida and Braden Ellis accosted David Boyles, also co-founder of Drag Story Hour Arizona, last October

Two employees of a rightwing youth organization who harassed and assaulted a queer professor last year agreed to a diversion program and admitted they were guilty of the acts.

Turning Point USA’s Kalen D’Almeida and Braden Ellis accosted the Arizona State University (ASU) professor David Boyles last October, hounding him about his sexuality and the classes he teaches. Boyles is an English instructor and the co-founder of Drag Story Hour Arizona.

At one point, D’Almeida pushed Boyles to the ground, bloodying his face. Boyles posted an image of his injuries online at the time, saying his physical injuries were “relatively minor” but that he felt “angry, violated, embarrassed and despairing at the fact that we have come to normalize this kind of harassment and violence” against the LGBTQ+ community.

Both D’Almeida and Ellis signed diversion agreements with prosecutors that acknowledge they committed the offenses and enter them into an educational program to avoid convictions, Phoenix TV station 12News reported.

8
Economics @lemmy.world MicroWave @lemmy.world
Starbucks resumes bargaining with union after two sides thaw relationship
www.cnbc.com Starbucks resumes bargaining with union after two sides thaw relationship

In February, Starbucks and Workers United said they found a "constructive path forward," marking a major strategic pivot for the coffee giant.

Starbucks resumes bargaining with union after two sides thaw relationship

KEY POINTS

  • Starbucks and the Workers United union will resume bargaining, ending a long stalemate.
  • In February, the two sides said they found a “constructive path forward,” marking a major strategic pivot for the coffee giant.
  • Labor laws do not require that the employer and union reach a collective bargaining agreement, only that both bargain in good faith.

***

Starbucks and the union that represents its baristas will resume contract negotiations on Wednesday, ending an extended stalemate.

The two sides’ return to the bargaining table follows their February announcement that they found a “constructive path forward” during mediation discussions related to litigation over the union’s use of Starbucks’ branding. It marked a major pivot for Starbucks, which had spent the previous two years battling Workers United and the broader movement to unionize its cafes.

Roughly 500 company-owned Starbucks in the U.S. have voted to unionize under Workers United since the first elections in December 2021, according to a tally from the National Labor Relations Board, as of Monday. But none of those locations, which make up a small fraction of total U.S. footprint, have come close to a collective bargaining agreement.

2
Bird flu virus found in pasteurized milk, though officials maintain supply is safe
www.nbcnews.com Bird flu virus found in pasteurized milk, though officials maintain supply is safe

The FDA is waiting on test results on the effects of pasteurization on the virus in cow's milk, but to date, it's seen nothing that would change the assessment that commercial milk is safe.

Bird flu virus found in pasteurized milk, though officials maintain supply is safe

The FDA is waiting on test results on the effects of pasteurization on the virus in cow's milk, but to date, it's seen nothing that would change the assessment that commercial milk is safe.

The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that fragments of the bird flu virus had been detected in some samples of pasteurized milk in the U.S. While the agency maintains that the milk is safe to drink, it notes that it is still waiting on the results of studies to confirm this.

The findings come less than a month after an outbreak of the H5N1 strain of bird flu was found, for the first time, in herds of dairy cows in several states. It has since been detected in herds in eight states.

The FDA has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to investigate the outbreak.

The fragments of the virus were found while testing samples of pasteurized milk, the FDA said. The testing method, called PCR testing, looks for bits of genetic material; a positive result doesn’t mean that live, infectious virus has been found.

9
New federal rule to guarantee hassle-free airline cash refunds, administration says
www.nbcnews.com New federal rule to guarantee hassle-free airline cash refunds, administration says

Airlines will be required to give refunds in cash for things like canceled or seriously changed or delayed flights, the administration said.

New federal rule to guarantee hassle-free airline cash refunds, administration says

Airlines will be required to give refunds in cash for things like canceled or seriously changed or delayed flights, the administration said.

A federal rule announced Wednesday will require airlines to quickly give cash refunds — without lengthy arguments — to passengers whose flights have been canceled or seriously delayed, the Biden administration said.

“Passengers deserve to get their money back when an airline owes them — without headaches or haggling,” Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg said in a statement.

The rule from the Department of Transportation says passengers who decline other reimbursement like travel credits are to get a cash refund.

It applies to canceled flights or when flights have a “significant change,” the administration said.

A “significant change” includes when departure or arrival times are three or more hours different than scheduled for domestic flights or six hours for international flights, and also cases where the airport is changed or connections added, it said.

Passengers are also to get a refund when their baggage is 12 hours late in delivery for domestic flights.

4
EU launches probe into Chinese procurement of medical devices
www.euronews.com EU launches probe into Chinese procurement of medical devices

The European Commission has launched a probe to examine how China favours its domestic companies in tenders for medical devices and weigh possible tit-for-tat measures. #EuropeNews

EU launches probe into Chinese procurement of medical devices

The European Commission has launched a probe to examine how China favours its domestic companies in tenders for medical devices and weigh possible tit-for-tat measures.

Brussels has long accused Beijing of employing distorting and discriminatory practices that make it all but impossible for European companies to win public contracts in China in the valuable sector of medical devices, where the bloc still retains a competitive edge.

These practices include stringent certification processes, opaque approval systems, clauses to safeguard "national interests" and demands for abnormally low prices that foreign manufacturers are simply unable to meet. Due to a "Buy China" policy, the EU's medical device industry has repeatedly decried that Chinese public tenders previously open to imports now specifically request China-made products.

Germany, the Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium and Italy are among the world's leading exporters of medical appliances, some of them with high technological added value such as X-ray machines or pacemakers, some of more commonly used like contact lenses and sticking plasters.

1
Asthma: Action needed on needless deaths, says charity
www.bbc.com Asthma: Action needed on needless deaths, says charity

There were more than 12,000 UK deaths in the past decade, many of them needless, a charity warns.

Asthma: Action needed on needless deaths, says charity

Urgent government action is needed to stop preventable asthma deaths, a leading charity has said.

More than 12,000 people in the UK have died from asthma attacks since 2014, according to Asthma and Lung UK.

It said the figures meant "shockingly little" had changed since a major report a decade ago which found two thirds of asthma deaths could have been avoided with better care.

Ministers in England and Wales said they were trying to improve services.

About 5.4 million people in the UK have asthma, a common lung condition which can cause breathing difficulties.

1
Isolated for six months, scientists in Antarctica began to develop their own accent
www.bbc.com Isolated for six months, scientists in Antarctica began to develop their own accent

Isolated for six months one winter, a group of scientists changed how they spoke.

Isolated for six months, scientists in Antarctica began to develop their own accent

Antarctica is a bleak, remote and dark place during the winter, but a handful of people each year brave the conditions to live in almost totally cut off from the rest of the world. The experience can change how they speak.

Over the following 26 weeks of near perpetual darkness and harsh weather, Clark and his fellow inhabitants at Rothera would work, eat and socialise together with barely any contact with home. Satellite phone calls are expensive and so used sparingly. With just each other for company and limited entertainment on the base, the "winterers", as they are known, would chat to each other – a lot.

"We would be talking to each other while working, on our breaks, playing pool or in our rooms," says Clark, who helped coordinate the collection of the winterers recordings. "We got to learn each other's stories pretty quickly. There were a lot of conversations about weather – these crazy winds we'd get, the sea ice, icebergs, clouds. We were very comfortable with each other." Their common language was English, sprinkled with slang words unique to the Antarctic research stations – more on this later.

Amid all that conversing, something surprising was happening: their accents were changing.

Clark and his colleagues did not notice this at the time. All they knew was that they were taking part in an unusual experiment, which involved tracking their own voices over time. This was done by making 10-minute recordings every few weeks. They would sit in front of a microphone and repeat the same 29 words as they appeared on a computer screen. *Food. Coffee. Hid. Airflow. *Most were words they used regularly during their day and contained vowel sounds known to differ in English accents.

3
Watch these hungry waxworms eat through plastic and digest it too
www.bbc.com Watch these hungry waxworms eat through plastic and digest it too

Wriggling critters armed with enzymes can break down plastics that would otherwise take decades, or even centuries to degrade.

Watch these hungry waxworms eat through plastic and digest it too

Wriggling critters armed with enzymes can break down plastics that would otherwise take decades, or even centuries to degrade.

At first glance there's nothing particularly remarkable about waxworms. The larval form of wax moths, these pale wriggling grubs feed on the wax that bees use to make their honeycomb. For beekeepers, the pests are something to swiftly get rid of without a second thought.

But in 2017 molecular biologist Federica Bertocchini, who at the time was researching the embryonic development of vertebrates at the Spanish National Research Council, stumbled on a potentially game-changing discovery about these creatures.

Bertocchini, an amateur beekeeper, threw some of the waxworms in a plastic bag after cleaning her hive, and left them alone. A short time later, she noticed the worms had started producing small holes in the plastic, which begun degrading as soon as it touched the worms' mouths.

16
US seeing surge of climate-related power outages, report says
www.theguardian.com US seeing surge of climate-related power outages, report says

High winds, rains, winter storms and tropical cyclones accounted for 80% of power interruptions over the last 20 years

US seeing surge of climate-related power outages, report says

High winds, rains, winter storms and tropical cyclones accounted for 80% of power interruptions over the last 20 years

Power outages in the US are surging, as climate-related extreme weather strain an already burdened energy grid.

Over the last decade, severe storm outages increased by 74% compared with the previous 10 years.

High winds, rains, winter storms and tropical cyclones including hurricanes, accounted for 80% of all power interruptions over the last 20 years, a new report from non-profit research group Climate Central shows.

“We’re seeing that the warming is having a direct impact on severe weather,” said Jen Brady, author of the report and senior data analyst at Climate Central. “The conditions that our infrastructure was built to handle are much different \[now] than what they were.”

3
US supreme court to hear arguments in key case on emergency abortion care
www.theguardian.com US supreme court to hear arguments in key case on emergency abortion care

Federal Emtala law has become focal point in heated debate over emergency abortions in states that ban procedure

US supreme court to hear arguments in key case on emergency abortion care

Federal Emtala law has become focal point in heated debate over emergency abortions in states that ban procedure

For the second time in a month, the US supreme court on Wednesday will hear arguments in a major abortion-rights case, the second to reach the justices since a 6-3 conservative majority overturned Roe v Wade two years ago.

Wednesday’s case involves a 1986 federal law called the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, or Emtala, which requires hospitals that receive federal dollars to stabilize patients who show up at their emergency rooms with medical emergencies.

Originally devised to stop hospitals from turning away uninsured patients, the law has become a focal point in the national debate over emergency abortions in states that ban the procedure. Doctors and abortion rights advocates say the law is one of the few tools they have left that allow them to help patients whose pregnancies threaten their health.

4
Senate passes $95 billion package sending aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan after months of delay
www.cnn.com Senate passes $95 billion package sending aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan after months of delay | CNN Politics

The Senate on Tuesday passed a long-delayed $95 billion package with wide bipartisan support after both sides of Capitol Hill have struggled for months to send aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan.

Senate passes $95 billion package sending aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan after months of delay | CNN Politics

The Senate on Tuesday passed a long-delayed $95 billion package with wide bipartisan support after both sides of Capitol Hill have struggled for months to send aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan.

The final vote was 79-18. Fifteen Republicans voted with three Democrats against the bill. Forty-eight Democrats and 31 Republicans voted for the bill.

The legislation next goes to President Joe Biden to sign it into law, who said he would sign the package Wednesday. Its passage is a significant victory for the US president, congressional Democrats and Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell, who long pushed to send aid to Ukraine even as the right wing of his party increasingly soured on support for Kyiv.

24
Argentina gripped by one of the largest protests in 20 years: ‘Public education is an inalienable right’
english.elpais.com Argentina gripped by one of the largest protests in 20 years: ‘Public education is an inalienable right’

The cuts to free public universities triggered mass demonstrations throughout the country, reflecting the growing social unrest surrounding President Javier Milei’s economic policy

Argentina gripped by one of the largest protests in 20 years: ‘Public education is an inalienable right’

The cuts to free public universities triggered mass demonstrations throughout the country, reflecting the growing social unrest surrounding President Javier Milei’s economic policy

The massive marches on Tuesday in defense of public universities in Argentina mark a turning point in the presidential mandate of Javier Milei. During his first four months in power, Milei has made sweeping decisions aimed at eliminating the fiscal deficit and shrinking the state: he has paralyzed public works, closed state agencies, fired tens of thousands of officials, and lowered pensions and salaries. Each new measure has found detractors and backers, but Milei’s privatization agenda seems to have found its first limit: the public university.

In a country wracked by economic crises and political discontent, free public higher education is one of the few pillars still standing. The working- and middle-class cling to it as a way for them to imagine a better future for their children. The images of classes taught in classrooms without light or outside the faculties due to the lack of funds to pay for electricity have outraged both Peronists and left-wing voters — on the opposite side of the political spectrum to Milei — as well as voters from groups closer to the government, including radicals and supporters of former president Mauricio Macri, and even Milei voters who now regret their support.

4
Australian police arrest 7 alleged teen extremists linked to stabbing of a bishop in a Sydney church
apnews.com Australian police arrest 7 alleged teen extremists linked to stabbing of a bishop in a Sydney church

Australian police say the seven arrested are part of a network that includes a 16-year-old boy who is accused of the stabbing of a bishop in a Sydney church last week.

Australian police arrest 7 alleged teen extremists linked to stabbing of a bishop in a Sydney church

Australian police arrested seven teenagers accused of following a violent extremist ideology in raids across Sydney on Wednesday, as a judge extended a ban on social media platform X sharing video of a knife attack on a bishop that started the criminal investigation.

The seven, aged 15 to 17, were part of a network that included a 16-year-old boy accused of stabbing a bishop in a Sydney church on April 15, police said.

Clips of the stabbing were taken from the church service’s livestream and subsequently made the rounds on X. An Australian regulator last week ordered the platform to take down the videos, an action the platform is fighting.

Five other teenagers were still being questioned late Wednesday by the Joint Counter-Terrorism Team, which includes federal and state police as well as the Australian Security Intelligence Organization, the nation’s main domestic spy agency, and the New South Wales Crime Commission, which specializes in extremists and organized crime.

8
How a second Trump presidency could tear Europe apart
www.politico.eu How a second Trump presidency could tear Europe apart

The former president’s return would cement a shift in the U.S. as a fact that can no longer be ignored.

How a second Trump presidency could tear Europe apart

The former president’s return would cement a shift in the U.S. as a fact that can no longer be ignored.

This is the moment most of Europe’s leaders hoped they would never see. The date is November 7, 2024, two days after Donald Trump edged out Joe Biden in the U.S. presidential election, and already the once-and-future president has announced he will force Ukraine to strike a peace deal with Russia and cede territories the Kremlin has claimed as its own.

Gathered in Budapest for a meeting of the European Political Community, the continent’s leaders stare out over the majestic Danube River with just one thing on their mind: How should they react?

Can they double down in the face of Trump’s opposition and finally give Kyiv whatever it takes, as a group of leaders clustered around Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and French President Emmanuel Macron are arguing? Should they follow Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s lead and welcome Trump’s initiative to bring the conflict to an end? Wouldn’t it be better to work with Washington and help shape the deal, as the German and Italian delegations keep saying? And most importantly, how can the continent’s leaders keep the sharp turn in U.S. foreign policy from driving their countries apart?

Trump’s return to the White House is no sure thing, but the possibility is forcing Europe’s leaders to ponder scenarios like this, and grapple with the questions they entail. And as the U.S. election cycle cranks into a higher gear, officials across the continent are becoming increasingly candid about the implications of a second Trump presidency.

8
Biden Administration sets higher staffing mandates. Most nursing homes don’t meet them
  • What you’re saying tracks with the article as well:

    Charlene Harrington, a professor emeritus at the nursing school of the University of California-San Francisco, said: “In their unchecked quest for profits, the nursing home industry has created its own problems by not paying adequate wages and benefits and setting heavy nursing workloads that cause neglect and harm to residents and create an unsatisfactory and stressful work environment.”

  • US, Philippines kick off combat drills amid China tension
  • I don’t think so. There are other important parts in the article:

    For the first time, the annual event will also involve troops from the Australian and French military. Fourteen other countries in Asia and Europe will attend as observers. The exercises will run until May 10.

    The 2024 exercises are also the first to take place outside of Philippine territorial waters.

    "Some of the exercises will take place in the South China Sea in an area outside of the Philippines' territorial sea. It's a direct challenge to China's expansive claims" in the region, Philippine political analyst Richard Heydarian told DW.

    He added that some of the exercises this year will also be close to Taiwan.

    This year's exercises have a "dual orientation pushing against China's aggressive intentions both in the South China Sea but also in Taiwan," he added.

  • Netanyahu's outraged response after report of pending US sanctions on IDF
  • According to ProPublica, it’s commonly done using Leahy Laws:

    The recommendations came from a special committee of State Department officials known as the Israel Leahy Vetting Forum. The panel, made up of Middle East and human rights experts, is named for former Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., the chief author of 1997 laws that requires the U.S. to cut off assistance to any foreign military or law enforcement units — from battalions of soldiers to police stations — that are credibly accused of flagrant human rights violations.

    Over the years, hundreds of foreign units, including from Mexico, Colombia and Cambodia, have been blocked from receiving any new aid. Officials say enforcing the Leahy Laws can be a strong deterrent against human rights abuses.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/israel-gaza-blinken-leahy-sanctions-human-rights-violations

  • FBI says Chinese hackers are inside US infrastructure to cause ‘devastating blow’
  • Oh you mean the post summary. Yeah, that's the article's verbatim linked URL. Check the article's source and see for yourself.

    In any case, thanks for pointing that out. I've stripped the tracker link and updated the post summary portion.

  • FBI says Chinese hackers are inside US infrastructure to cause ‘devastating blow’
  • Huh? That’s the exact same link as the post’s.

  • Zelenskyy warns Russia has penetrated US politics, invites Trump to Ukraine
  • Wow the ads. I assumed everyone was already using some sort of ad blocker.

  • EPA imposes first national limits on 'forever chemicals' in drinking water
  • FWIW the most recent analysis I came across from a law professor makes me think the emergence of the "major questions doctrine" is more concerning:

    In Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo, the US Supreme Court will decide whether to overrule one of its most frequently cited precedents—its 1984 opinion in Chevron v. NRDC. The decision in Loper may change the language that lawyers use in briefs and professors use in class, but is unlikely to significantly affect case outcomes involving interpretation of the statutes that agencies administer. In practice, it’s the court’s new major questions doctrine announced in 2021 that could fundamentally change how agencies operate.

    I am much more concerned about the court’s 2021 decision to create the “major questions doctrine” and to apply it in four other cases than I am about the effects of a potential reversal of Chevron in Loper. Lower courts are beginning to rely on the major questions doctrine as the basis to overturn scores of agency decisions. That doctrine has potential to make it impossible for any agency to take any significant action.

    https://news.bloomberglaw.com/us-law-week/courts-new-chevron-analysis-likely-to-follow-one-of-these-paths

  • Oregon city can't limit church's homeless meal services, federal judge rules
  • Kudos for doing additional research and sharing it with sources!

  • Supreme Court signals it is likely to reject a challenge to abortion pill access
  • Standing is a specific legal term that defines whether a party is allowed to sue, and injury is also a legal term in this case. Cornell Law School has a great intro on the legal requirements to establish standing using a 3-part test:

    • The plaintiff must have suffered an "injury in fact," meaning that the injury is of a legally protected interest which is (a) concrete and particularized and (b) actual or imminent
    • There must be a causal connection between the injury and the conduct brought before the court
    • It must be likely, rather than speculative, that a favorable decision by the court will redress the injury.

    In this case, seems to be the Supreme Court is skeptical that these doctors have satisfied this 3-part standing test, especially the injury in fact one. If SCOTUS decides that these doctors don't have standing, then the lawsuit is dismissed.

  • Locked Removed
    Biden knew Israel was bombing indiscriminately – WaPo
  • Just pointing out the headline seems to imply it’s from WaPo when in fact it was written by RT.

  • Senior doctors in South Korea submit resignations, deepening dispute over medical school plan
  • Agreed. Here's some more context:

    Korea has the second-lowest number of physicians among members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, leading to some of the highest doctors' wages among surveyed member nations.

    Doctors in Korea earn the most among 28 member countries that provided related data. Following Korea, the highest earners are in the Netherlands, Germany, Ireland and the UK. The US was among the countries for which data was not provided.

    Measured by PPP, which takes into account local living costs, salaried specialists earned an average of $192,749 annually in 2020, According to the 2023 OECD Health Statistics report. That was 60 percent more than the OECD average. Korean GP salaries ranked sixth.

    ... The country also ranked low in the number of medical school graduates -- 7.3 per 100,000 people, which is the third-lowest after Israel and Japan, and nearly half the OCED average of 14 graduates for every 100,000 people.

    https://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20230730000088

  • Senior doctors in South Korea submit resignations, deepening dispute over medical school plan
  • These doctors are not telling the whole story. More context from the article:

    Public surveys show that a majority of South Koreans support the government’s push to create more doctors, and critics say that doctors, one of the highest-paid professions in South Korea, worry about lower incomes due to a rise in the number of doctors.

    Officials say more doctors are required to address a long-standing shortage of physicians in rural areas and in essential but low-paying specialties. But doctors say newly recruited students would also try to work in the capital region and in high-paying fields like plastic surgery and dermatology. They say the government plan would also likely result in doctors performing unnecessary treatments due to increased competition.

  • Women are getting off birth control amid misinformation explosion
  • On top of conservative ideology, some people also want to make money:

    Martinez co-founded a menstrual cycle tracking app called 28 that is backed by conservative billionaire and tech mogul Peter Thiel. The company, 28 Wellness, told The Post it does not disclose its investors, but Evie announced Thiel Capital’s support when the product launched. A spokesman for Thiel did not respond to requests for comment. The app’s website declares: “Hormonal birth control promised freedom but tricked our bodies into dysfunction and pain.” The “feminine fitness” app told The Post it has “never been marketed as an alternative to hormonal birth control.”

  • Consumers can start ordering Opill online today
  • From the article:

    No states have made such proposals or actions on restricting access to Opill, but the concern stems from the US Supreme Court’s Dobbs decision in 2022, which reversed Roe v. Wade and overturned the constitutional right to an abortion.

    and:

    But these examples have not set a precedent for what type of authority states may have to restrict access to an FDA-approved medication, Gupta said.

    When it comes to Opill, “many states also allow pharmacists to refuse to participate in ‘health care’ that they find morally objectionable. This could include providing individuals with Opill even though it is OTC,” she said. “Legal approval and actual access are two distinct issues, with the latter influenced by a broader set of factors including state policies, healthcare practices, and socio-economic determinants of health.”

  • MicroWave MicroWave @lemmy.world

    Hi.

    I'm a bit of a news junkie.

    I'm also MicroWave on lemm.ee.

    Posts 8.6K
    Comments 953