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InitialsDiceBearhttps://github.com/dicebear/dicebearhttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/„Initials” (https://github.com/dicebear/dicebear) by „DiceBear”, licensed under „CC0 1.0” (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/)FA
Fades @lemmy.world
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One of my favorite shots I've captured of my little Geophagus Altifrons ✨🐟✨

They're (impossible to tell gender until they quite literally start breeding) pushing past 2 inches! The patterns are coming in on the dorsal and tail especially right now! They will keep growing up to ~10 or so inches, so a long road ahead! They'll be the tank boss when they're bigger but for now that's left to the Angelfish and Electric Blue Acara :)

If you're curious what an adult looks like, check out this great video by PrimeTime Aquatics (channel definitely recommended)

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Free drink refills could be banned in Wales under Welsh government consultation
  • Gotta enshrine laws to protect the capitalists!

    They say its about unhealthy food and drink, but why are drink refills considers a health issue to the point of requiring law? Plenty offer more than just unhealthy soda and trash like that.

    Health Secretary Eluned Morgan has launched a consultation to restrict "promotions of food products high in fat, sugar and salt".

    Article specifically calls out some names:

    It includes a proposal to prohibit retailers from offering free drink refills, which many high street restaurants including Nando's and Five Guys offer.

    Taking Five Guys for example they offer coca cola freestyle:

    https://www.fiveguys.com/menu/Drinks

    https://www.coca-colafreestyle.com/choices/?filter1=all drinks

    Which offers options such as minute maid lemonaid, vitamin water, etc. with non-sugar options. This law would punish those same drinks in the name of health.

  • Trump picks Sen. J.D. Vance as his running mate
  • Look no further than J.D. Vance's statements about trump, you will see a very clear disdain and disapproval of Trump and then suddenly, very pro Trump. Happens every time with these fascists.

  • Those of you who don't vote, why?
  • when you feel it doesn’t matter

    Nobody should give a fuck about how it fEeLs. Elections are verifiable and essential. You cry about the electoral college and yet don't vote which gives said EC even more of an advantage.

  • Those of you who don't vote, why?
  • It's one day, with most states allowing mail-in in advance. You have no excuse for not fulfilling your duty as a citizen to ensure least negative outcome of elections.

    I had my own shit to deal with

    So does every other fucking adult, and now we have even more shit to deal with, thanks for that

  • Democrats Need to Wake Up From Their ‘West Wing’ Fantasy
  • Well, eliminating the filibuster is too extreme, you’ll just have to vote harder.

    The Ds didn't just decide not to kill the filibuster because it was too extreme, the goddamn billionaires BOUGHT Manchin and Sinema which killed that effort in the cradle. It's already bad enough, you don't need bend the truth.

  • www.vanityfair.com “You’re Telling Me That Thing Is Forged?”: The Inside Story of How Trump’s “Body Guy” Tried and Failed to Order a Massive Military Withdrawal

    In an excerpt from his new book, Tired of Winning, Jonathan Karl reveals how officials were stunned when a presidential directive pulling troops out of Afghanistan and Somalia landed on their desk. Of course, they’d later learn that it wasn’t exactly Trump’s idea.

    “You’re Telling Me That Thing Is Forged?”: The Inside Story of How Trump’s “Body Guy” Tried and Failed to Order a Massive Military Withdrawal

    Highlights:

    A former quarterback at the University of Connecticut, he achieved short-lived internet fame in 2011 when a video of him throwing trick passes went viral. Trump liked having him around and soon made him his personal assistant, taking him along whenever he traveled. As the campaign ramped up, he became Trump’s “body guy,” carrying the candidate’s bags and relaying messages.

    he was also named director of the Presidential Personnel Office, which is responsible for the vetting, hiring, and firing of the four thousand political appointees who serve in the executive branch. McEntee may have never hired or fired anybody before in his life, but he was fiercely loyal—and for Trump, that made him the perfect choice for the job.

    McEntee’s team reached the apex of its power after Trump lost the election in 2020. Within days, they orchestrated sweeping changes to the civilian leadership at the Pentagon that resulted in Defense Secretary Mark Esper and other top officials being fired. In preparing for Esper’s ouster, McEntee and his team created a memo listing the Pentagon chief’s sins against Trump, arguing he “consistently breaks from POTUS’ direction, and has failed to see through his policies.”

    Trump fired Esper and replaced him with McEntee’s preferred successor, National Counterterrorism Center director and Army Special Forces veteran Christopher Miller. To serve as Miller’s senior advisor, McEntee recruited a retired Army colonel named Douglas Macgregor, whose regular appearances on Fox News had caught the White House’s attention. Chief among his qualifications was his penchant for praising Trump’s approach to US military involvement and calling for martial law along the US-Mexico border.

    Three days after Macgregor arrived at the Pentagon, he called McEntee and told him he couldn’t accomplish any of the items on their handwritten to-do list without a signed order from the president. “Hey, they’re not going to do anything we want, or the president wants, without a directive,” Macgregor told him, emphasizing the need for an official White House order signed by Trump. The Pentagon’s stonewalling made sense, of course: You don’t make major changes to America’s global defense posture based on a glorified Post-it note from the president’s body guy. The order, Macgregor added, should focus on the top priority from McEntee’s list—Afghanistan—and it had to include a specific date for the complete withdrawal of all uniformed military personnel from the country. He suggested January 31, 2021.

    McEntee and an assistant quickly typed up the directive, but they moved the Afghanistan withdrawal timeline up to January 15—just five days before Trump was set to leave office—and added a second mandate: a complete withdrawal of US troops from Somalia by December 31, 2020. McEntee, of course, didn’t know the first thing about drafting a presidential directive—let alone one instructing the movement of thousands of servicemen and -women. He had two jobs in the White House—only one of which he was qualified for—and neither one had anything to do with national security or the military. An order even 10 percent as consequential as the one McEntee was drafting would typically go through the National Security Council with input from the civilian leadership at the Pentagon, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the military commanders in the region. Instead, the guy who usually carried Trump’s bags was hammering it out on his computer, consulting with nobody but the retired colonel the president had just hired because he had seen him on cable TV.

    Easy enough. The duo wrote up the order, had the president sign it, and sent it over to Kash Patel, the new acting defense secretary’s chief of staff. Chaos ensued. Upon receiving the order from his chief of staff, Christopher Miller called Joint Chiefs chairman Mark Milley to his office to discuss next steps. After reading the order, Milley told the January 6 Committee, he looked at Patel, who had just started working at the Pentagon three days earlier. “Who gave the president the military advice for this?” Milley asked him. “Did you do this?” “No,” Patel answered. “I had nothing to do with it.”

    Milley turned to the acting defense secretary. “Did you give the President military advice on this?” he asked.

    “No. Not me,” Miller answered. “Okay, well, we’ve got to go over and see the president,” Milley said, noting his job required him to provide military advice to the commander in chief. “I’ve got duties to do here, constitutional duties. I’ve got to make sure he’s properly advised.” And with that, Miller and Milley went to the White House to see Robert O’Brien, Trump’s national security advisor. “Robert, where’s this coming from?” Milley asked O’Brien. “Is this true?” “I’ve never seen it before,” O’Brien told him.

    They were joined in the meeting by retired lieutenant general Keith Kellogg, the national security advisor to Vice President Pence. “Something is really wrong here,” Kellogg said, reading through the order. “This doesn’t look right.” “You’re telling me that thing is forged?” Milley responded in disbelief. “That’s a forged piece of paper directing a military operation by the president of the United States? That’s forged, Keith?” Despite McEntee’s best efforts—which included not only the advice from Macgregor but several minutes of searching the internet—the only part of the document that looked anything like an official presidential order was Trump’s signature at the bottom. But even that, Kellogg thought, could have been the work of an autopen used to mimic the president’s autograph on thousands of unofficial letters sent out by the White House.

    They found him where he spent most of his time after the November election—in his private dining room next to the Oval Office, where the television on the wall was almost always on. Once the president confirmed he had indeed signed the document, O’Brien and Cipollone explained to him that such an order should go through some sort of process, and that an abrupt movement of so many US troops would be dangerous and unwise without proper planning. At the very least, they told him, such an order should be reviewed by White House lawyers.

    “I said this would be very bad,” O’Brien recalled telling Trump. “Our position is that because it didn’t go through any proper process—the lawyers hadn’t cleared it, the staff [secretary] hadn’t cleared it, NSC [National Security Council] hadn’t cleared it—that it’s our position that the order is null and void.”

    18
    www.justice.gov Three Arrested for Operating High-End Brothel Network

    BOSTON – Three individuals have been arrested in connection with operating sophisticated high-end brothels in greater Boston and eastern Virginia. Commercial sex buyers allegedly included elected officials, high tech and pharmaceutical executives, doctors, military officers, government contractors t...

    Three Arrested for Operating High-End Brothel Network

    Since at least July 2020, prosecutors allege that Han Lee, 41, James Lee, 68, and Junmyung Lee, 30, ran brothels that advertised primarily Asian women under the guise that they were nude models selling their services to professional photographers. The three were charged with conspiracy to coerce and entice to travel to engage in illegal sexual activity.

    The brothels’ clients, which prosecutors allege could number in the hundreds, also included tech and pharmaceutical executives, doctors, professors, lawyers, scientists and accountants, according to court filings, which did not name any of the alleged clients. “Pick a profession; they’re probably represented in this case,” said acting U.S. attorney for Massachusetts Joshua Levy at a news conference Wednesday. “They are the men who fueled this commercial sex ring.”

    The clients, an affidavit alleges, paid the defendants as much as $600 to engage in sexual activities with women whose nude or semi-nude pictures, height, weight and other identifying features were advertised on two purported modeling websites. The women would meet their customers at one of nine locations, where monthly rent was as high as $3,664, according to the affidavit. The brothels were located in Cambridge and Watertown, Mass., and Fairfax and Tysons, Va., the affidavit stated.

    The allegations mirror a sex service that for 13 years catered to Washington’s political elite, including a sitting senator. Known as the D.C. Madam, Deborah Jeane Palfrey was convicted of running that operation in 2008. Records of her ring included the names of 815 clients, and in 2016, Palfrey’s former lawyer said her phone records “could be relevant” to the presidential election. A judge later blocked the release of those records.

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    Act II ending bug

    FYI: if you use a familiar like from Halsin during the Act II boss fights, it seems to fucks the post fight and so, among other things, the discussion between the two moon maidens doesn’t trigger. If you don’t go speak to them directly neither will show up at camp and if you then continue on to act III, well, you’re absolutely FUCKED.

    Initially I had problems looting thorm and then coming back to camp and being unable to speak to anyone. Finally after a few reloads I manage to get past that bullshit.

    Fast forward 9+ hours….

    I was about to go talk to a certain someone after crossing the bridge into the lower city and was checking side quests first and noticed the nightsong quest was bugged and it was still telling me she is in a Shar temple. What the fuck!? I saved that bitch already and she fought by my fucking side against thorm!!!!

    I had to go back to a save nine fucking hours ago (no goddamn way to get back to moonrise after leaving for BG, jesus fucking Christ)

    I’m fucking livid. So much exploring, questing, inven management, leveling, god fucking damnit.

    Maybe this will save someone else the same pain.

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