Skip Navigation
FaceDeer FaceDeer @fedia.io

Basically a deer with a human face. Despite probably being some sort of magical nature spirit, his interests are primarily in technology and politics and science fiction.

Spent many years on Reddit and then some time on kbin.social.

Posts 0
Comments 980
Two 80-something journalists tried ChatGPT. Then, they sued to protect the 'written word'
  • Have them predict what a reasonable plan would look like. Then they can start working from that.

  • Two 80-something journalists tried ChatGPT. Then, they sued to protect the 'written word'
  • That sort of thing can be handled by the framework outside of the AI's literal context window. I did some tinkering with some automated story-writing stuff a while back, just to get some experience with LLM APIs, and even working with an AI that had only a few thousand tokens' context I was able to get some pretty decent large-scale story structure. The key is to have the AI work in the same way that some human authors do; have them first generate an outline for the story, write up some character biographies, do revisions of those things, and only once a bunch of that stuff is done should it start writing actual prose.

  • What would you do if you were on an underground train, when suddenly the train shook, you passed through a portal, and the next thing you knew your carriage was lying in an unknown new world?
  • We should split up to explore more efficiently!

    Ohh, this small creature in the underbrush looks adorable! I'm going to pick it up.

  • What would you do if you were on an underground train, when suddenly the train shook, you passed through a portal, and the next thing you knew your carriage was lying in an unknown new world?
  • Probably quite quickly, if the train was traveling at any significant speed when all of a sudden it had no tracks under it.

  • Clarence Thomas Took Free Yacht Trip to Russia, Chopper Flight to Putin’s Hometown: Dems
  • It's still surprisingly small a price for selling out such a large and powerful country.

  • Hanging onto Windows 10 to avoid Copilot AI? I’ve got bad news for you
  • Oh no, a feature that I personally don't want to use!

    I could just turn it off... or I could install an entirely different operating system, that seems simpler.

  • Hanging onto Windows 10 to avoid Copilot AI? I’ve got bad news for you
  • Technology I Can't Imagine Anyone Having Different Opinions From Mine About™

  • How Much Do Customers Trust Businesses That Use AI? – Free Ai all
  • Just in case people think this is a literal excerpt from the article (that was my first impression) the actual survey results were:

    33% are very likely to trust 32% are somewhat likely to trust 21% are neutral 14% express some level of distrust

  • How Much Do Customers Trust Businesses That Use AI? – Free Ai all
  • Or, you're in a bubble and are surprised to discover that most people aren't in it with you.

  • Meet the New Class of Cadets in Star Trek: Starfleet Academy
  • But we need to attract a hip young new audience! The sort of audience that doesn't care about Star Trek, and just wants teen drama and unprofessional nonsense!

  • Russian Missile Identified in Kyiv Children’s Hospital Attack - bellingcat
  • And of course the Russians try to blame everyone but themselves.

    The obvious evidence that this was a Kh-101 aside, even if it had been a stray anti-air missile this damage would still be the direct result of Russia firing on civilian targets. Russia's attempt to deflect blame is utterly pathetic.

  • Why is it impossible to reverse-engineer closed source software?
  • There's a lot of outright rejection of the possibilities of AI these days, I think because it's turning out to be so capable. People are getting frightened of it and so jump to denial as a coping mechanism.

    I recalled reading about an LLM that had been developed just a couple of weeks ago for translating source code into intermediate representations (a step along the way to full compilation) and when I went hunting for a reference to refresh my memory I found this article from March about exactly what's being discussed here - an LLM that translates assembly language into high-level source code. Looks like this one's just a proof of concept rather than something highly practical, but prove the concept it does.

    I wonder if there are research teams out there sitting on more advanced models right now, fretting about how big a bombshell it'll be when this gets out.

  • Home routing and encryption technologies are making lawful interception harder, Europol warns
  • We're back to "privacy is a good thing even if it enables 'criminals'"? Yesterday there was rather a lot of negativity towards GNU Taler and other means of transferring money privately because it enabled tax evasion and such.

  • Why is it impossible to reverse-engineer closed source software?
  • As others have mentioned, it's possible but very complicated. Decompilers produce code that isn't very readable for humans.

    I am indeed awaiting the big news headlines that will for some reason catch everyone by surprise when a LLM comes along that's trained to "translate" machine code into a nice easily-comprehensible high-level programming language. It's going to be a really big development, even though it doesn't make programs legally "open source" it'll make it all source available.

  • The real lesson for America in the French and British elections
  • Just because it worked out in the end didn't mean it was a good idea to try.

  • GNU Taler is not your friend
  • DAI has been around for six and a half years at this point.

    How exactly is its "scam" supposed to work?

  • answer = sum(n) / len(n)
  • I'd love to hear about any studies explaining the mechanism of human cognition.

    Right now it's looking pretty neural-net-like to me. That's kind of where we got the idea for neural nets from in the first place.

  • answer = sum(n) / len(n)
  • The meme would work just the same with the "machine learning" label replaced with "human cognition."