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Bampot Sony D Bampot @lemmy.world
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Garry Nolan on UFOs, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and Eric Weinstein

In this episode, we dive into a range of fascinating topics, starting with Jung's concept of the collective unconscious and archetypes. Garry shares his personal UFO experience and explores the possibility of life beyond Earth. We discuss the potential for future human evolution into non-human forms and Garry's thoughts on Neil deGrasse Tyson. The conversation then balances intrigue with scientific professionalism, highlighting the important work of the Sol Foundation.

We touch on the insights of Eric Weinstein and the peer review process, and discuss how we can prepare for potential encounters with non-human entities. Finally, we explore the technology necessary for colonizing other planets, rounding out a thought-provoking discussion on humanity's future in the cosmos.

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www.universetoday.com Moon Dust Could Contaminate Lunar Explorers' Water Supply

Water purification is a big business on Earth. Companies offer everything from desalination to providing just the right pH level for drinking water. But on the Moon, there won’t be a similar technical infrastructure to support the astronauts attempting to make a permanent base there. And there’s one...

Moon Dust Could Contaminate Lunar Explorers' Water Supply

Water purification is a big business on Earth. Companies offer everything from desalination to providing just the right pH level for drinking water. But on the Moon, there won’t be a similar technical infrastructure to support the astronauts attempting to make a permanent base there. And there’s one particular material that will make water purification even harder – Moon dust.

We’ve reported plenty of times about the health problems caused by the lunar regolith, so it seems apparent that you don’t want to drink it. Even more so, the abrasive dust can cause issues with seals, such as those used in electrolyzers to create rocket fuel out of in-situ water resources. It can even adversely affect water purification equipment itself.

Unfortunately, this contamination is inevitable. Lunar dust is far too adhesive and electrostatically charged to be kept completely separate from the machinery that would recycle or purify the water. So, a group of researchers from DLR in Germany decided to test what would happen if you intentionally dissolved lunar regolith.

The short answer is, unsurprisingly, nothing good. Dissolved lunar regolith causes pH, turbidity, and aluminum concentrations all exceed World Health Organization benchmarks for safe drinking water. This happened even with short exposure times (2 minutes) and static pH values, as they used a 5.5 pH buffer in part of the experiments.

Experimental study to characterize water contaminated by lunar dust

https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/space-technologies/articles/10.3389/frspt.2024.1366591/full

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phys.org Chinese lunar probe finds water in moon samples

A Chinese lunar probe found traces of water in samples of the moon's soil, scientists have said, as the country pushes its ambitious space program into high gear.

Chinese lunar probe finds water in moon samples

A Chinese lunar probe found traces of water in samples of the moon's soil.

A NASA infrared detector already confirmed in 2020 the existence of water on the moon, while scientists found traces of water in recent analyses of samples dating from the 1960s and 1970s.

But the Chang'e-5 samples are from a "much higher latitude", providing new clues as to what form water takes on the moon's surface.

The samples suggest that "water molecules can persist in sunlit areas of the moon in the form of hydrated salts.

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From the archives: Jacques Benoit’s (failed) experiments with telepathic snails

In 1850 a French inventor made a discovery he believed would revolutionise communications. With his insights the electric telegraph would become obsolete overnight. He predicted instantaneous communication around the globe — at the time an extraordinary idea, since wireless telegraphy would not be demonstrated by Marconi for another forty-five years. What made it all the more remarkable was that he had discovered the telepathic powers of the humble snail.

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omniletters.com 11-mile thick diamond layer on Mercury

Mercury has a layer of diamonds seventeen kilometers thick, according to scientists.

11-mile thick diamond layer on Mercury

Mercury has a layer of diamonds 17 kilometers thick, according to scientists.

The planet Mercury, known for its dull gray surface due to its excess of carbon, may hide a brilliant surprise in its depths. Recent research suggests the existence of a layer of diamonds up to 17 kilometers thick in the rocky interior of the planet.

According to a study published in the journal Nature Communications, this layer of diamonds could help explain some of Mercury’s intriguing features. Yanhao Lin, co-author of the study, commented that the planet’s high carbon content has always suggested the possibility of something special inside.

These diamonds, formed in the ocean of magma, would have sunk and accumulated at the boundary between the core and the mantle, forming a layer of jewels approximately 480 kilometers below the surface. This discovery could also help explain Mercury’s magnetic field, since diamond, being a good conductor of heat, could cause significant temperature variations by stirring up the liquid in the planet’s core.

In addition, the research suggests that other terrestrial planets with similar composition and sizes could also have diamond layers formed under extreme conditions of heat and pressure.

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ancavasculitisnews.com Silica exposure at work could trigger MPA in some cases: Report

Occupational silica exposure, for people with a genetic predisposition working around the mineral, could lead to MPA, a case report suggests.

Silica exposure at work could trigger MPA in some cases: Report

Occupational exposure to silica, one of the most common minerals in the earth’s crust, may lead to microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) — a type of ANCA-associated vasculitis — particularly in individuals with a genetic predisposition to autoimmune diseases, a case report suggests.

Silica, found in sand and rocks, is known to stimulate inflammatory reactions. In fact, silicosis is an occupational lung disease common among those exposed to the mineral that can cause kidney injury and lead to more autoimmune conditions.

In a recent report, a team of researchers in Turkey detailed the case of a 29-year-old man with kidney dysfunction linked to silica exposure who was diagnosed with MPA associated with silicosis.

“Considering that the use and therefore frequency of exposure to silica is increasing with industrial development, awareness should be raised of not only the pulmonary effects of silicosis but also the renal [kidney] damage,” the researchers wrote.

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Werewolves of Ossory

The legendary werewolves of Ossory, a kingdom of early medieval Ireland, are the subject of a number of accounts in medieval Irish, English and Norse works. The werewolves were said to have been the descendants of a legendary figure named Laignech Fáelad whose line gave rise to the kings of Ossory. The legends may have derived from the activities of warriors in ancient Ireland who were the subject of frequent literary comparisons to wolves, and who may have adopted lupine hairstyles or worn wolf-skins while they "went wolfing" and carried out raids.

Gerald of Wales

Gerald's Topographia presents the story of an unnamed priest who is travelling from Ulster to Meath when he encounters a wolf in the woods. To his amazement, the wolf tells him not to be afraid and talks about God. The priest begs the wolf not to harm him and urges him to explain. The wolf replies:

There are two of us, a man and a woman, natives of Ossory, who through the curse of one Natalis, saint and abbot, are compelled every seven years to put off the human form and depart from the dwellings of men. Quitting entirely the human form, we assume that of wolves. At the end of the seven years, if they chance to survive, two others being substituted in their places, they return to their country and their former shape. And now, she who is my partner in this visitation lies dangerously sick not inspired by divine charity, to give her the consolations of your priestly office.

The priest complies and performs the last rites over the sick female wolf. The male wolf pulls down the wolf skin of the female, revealing an elderly human female underneath, to reassure the priest that he is not committing blasphemy.

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www.smithsonianmag.com This Bronze Age Ship Replica, Made From Reeds and Goat Hair, Just Sailed 50 Nautical Miles

Researchers constructed the vessel using a list of materials found on a 4,000-year-old clay tablet

This Bronze Age Ship Replica, Made From Reeds and Goat Hair, Just Sailed 50 Nautical Miles

Researchers constructed the vessel using a list of materials found on a 4,000-year-old clay tablet

Thousands of years ago, “Magan” was the name of a region located in what is now the United Arab Emirates and parts of Oman. To reconstruct the boat, experts relied on a clay tablet from 2100 B.C.E. that detailed the necessary building materials.

“The clay tablet was discovered in the ancient site of Tello, southern Iraq, written in Sumerian, one of the earliest known written languages, it depicts a shopping list of materials including four different types of wood, palm reeds, hides, goat hair, fish oil and bitumen.”

The researchers constructed the boat using traditional Bronze Age tools and techniques. To create the outer hull, they gathered 15 tons of locally sourced reeds. They then soaked the reeds, stripped away their leaves, and crushed and tied them together with date palm fiber rope. Finally, the builders attached the reed bundles to the internal wooden frames and coated them in bitumen, a viscous liquid made from crude oil that helped waterproof the vessel.

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Ancient genetic blueprint for regeneration revealed in brittle star genome

The ability to regenerate body parts is remarkably common across the animal kingdom. Cut off the leg of an axolotl, the arm of a starfish, or the tail of a salamander, and all will regrow in a month or two.

Now, researchers have found that these powers trace back to shared, ancient genetic roots. The newly sequenced genome of the brittle star, a particularly impressive regenerator, reveals it uses many of the same genes to regrow its limbs as do distantly related animals. That suggests this mechanism did not evolve in different species independently, but has been preserved for hundreds of millions of years.

The team then looked at which genes were active during different stages of regeneration, cutting the arms off more than 3500 brittle stars and measuring RNA levels as the arms regrew in the following days and weeks.

They found that in the initial stages of regeneration, when the wound was beginning to heal, the brittle star expressed genes it had evolved relatively recently. But during the proliferative phase of regeneration, where cells rapidly divide to replace lost tissues, it expressed ancient genes it had acquired hundreds of millions of years ago.

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www.nature.com Mystery oxygen source discovered on the sea floor — bewildering scientists

A chemical reaction could be producing oxygen by splitting water molecules, but its source of energy remains unknown.

Mystery oxygen source discovered on the sea floor — bewildering scientists

A chemical reaction could be producing oxygen by splitting water molecules, but its source of energy remains unknown.

Something is pumping out large amounts of oxygen at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, at depths where a total lack of sunlight makes photosynthesis impossible.

The phenomenon was discovered in a region strewn with ancient, plum-sized formations called polymetallic nodules, which could play a part in the oxygen production by catalysing the splitting of water molecules, researchers suspect.

"We have another source of oxygen on the planet, other than photosynthesis,” says study co-author Andrew Sweetman, a sea-floor ecologist at the Scottish Association for Marine Science in Oban, UK — although the mechanism behind this oxygen production remains a mystery. The findings could also have implications for understanding how life began, he says, as well as for the possible impact of deep-sea mining in the region.

Eva Stüeken, a biogeochemist at the University of St Andrews, UK, says that the results could also have implications for proposals to look for the signature of possible life in the light spectrum of extrasolar planets. “The presence of O2 gas on other planets would perhaps have to be interpreted with additional caution,” she says.

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www.nature.com I pioneered a method to study cement using a particle accelerator

Materials scientist Shiva Shirani measures how cement hardens at the nanoscale to inform how to develop a more eco-friendly material.

I pioneered a method to study cement using a particle accelerator

The world makes four billion tonnes of Portland cement, the main ingredient of concrete, every year. This has an enormous carbon footprint — up to 8% of humanity’s yearly production of CO2 comes from this process.

At the moment, low-carbon alternatives aren’t as durable as Portland cement, which hardens fast and strong. The goal of my PhD is to determine how this cement forms so that we might be able to develop materials with a lower carbon footprint.

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medicalxpress.com Blood proteins predict the risk of developing more than 60 diseases, study finds

Research on thousands of proteins measured from a drop of blood demonstrates the ability of proteins to predict the onset of many diverse diseases.

Blood proteins predict the risk of developing more than 60 diseases, study finds

Research on thousands of proteins measured from a drop of blood demonstrates the ability of proteins to predict the onset of many diverse diseases.

The protein data is linked to the participants' electronic health records. The authors used advanced analytical techniques to pinpoint, for each disease, a 'signature' of between the five and 20 proteins most important for prediction.

The researchers report the ability of protein 'signatures' to predict the onset of 67 diseases including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, motor neuron disease, pulmonary fibrosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy.

The protein prediction models out-performed models based on standard, clinically recorded information. Prediction based on blood cell counts, cholesterol, kidney function and diabetes tests (glycated hemoglobin) performed less well than the protein prediction models for most examples.

"We are therefore extremely excited about the opportunities that our protein signatures may have for earlier detection and ultimately improved prognosis for many diseases, including severe conditions such as multiple myeloma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We identified so many promising examples, the next step is to select high priority diseases and evaluate their proteomic prediction in a clinical setting."

Proteomic signatures improve risk prediction for common and rare diseases

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-024-03142-z

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www.thecollector.com What Can History and Archaeology Tell Us About the Druids?

The druids played a significant role in European Iron Age mythology. Read on to find out how their legend compares to reality.

What Can History and Archaeology Tell Us About the Druids?

The druids played a significant role in European Iron Age mythology. Read on to find out how their legend compares to reality.

Historical sources about the druids are limited and their depictions are cloaked in Roman propaganda in which they are often portrayed as barbaric. Sadly, due to the oral nature of druidic teachings, there is no written record from the Iron Age druids themselves, and we therefore have to rely on the Roman accounts and inferences gained from the scarce archaeological record. One description of the druids comes from Julius Caesar in his Gallic Wars.

During his time in Britain, Caesar also recounted a tale concerning the use of a wicker man. Caesar wrote an account that was apparently firsthand, although it is important to note that many Roman writers would reference other works and attempt to pass them off as a firsthand account.

His commentary, however, included a description of a large wickerwork structure that was stuffed with living people and lit ablaze; he also detailed how criminals were the favored sacrifices, although, in their absence, innocents could also be used.

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theferret.scot Security lapses at nukes body spur calls for investigation

There was a significant rise in security lapses at the body responsible for the UK’s nuclear weapons last year, prompting calls for an investigation.

Security lapses at nukes body spur calls for investigation

There was a significant rise in security lapses at the body responsible for the UK’s nuclear weapons last year, The Ferret can reveal, prompting calls for an  investigation.

There were 83 security incidents at the Defence Nuclear Organisation (DNO) between April 2023 and March 2024.

The DNO is based at the MoD’s headquarters in London but also has staff in other locations around the UK including at Coulport, on Loch Long, where around 200 of the UK’s arsenal of nuclear warheads are stored.

In June, The Ferret uncovered that there had been a separate 174 security breaches at Coulport and the Trident submarine base at Faslane, near Helensburgh, between 2018 and 2022.

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Hail to the Chief

"Hail to the Chief" is a piece originally about a boat in Scotland, but today it is best known as the personal anthem of the president of the United States, adapted by James Sanderson from an original Scottish Gaelic melody.

Verses from Sir Walter Scott's 1810 narrative poem The Lady of the Lake, including "The Boat Song" ("Hail to the Chief") with which the clan welcomes the arrival by boat of their chieftain Roderick Dhu, were set to music around 1812 by the songwriter James Sanderson.

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www.gov.scot Building a new Scotland

Series of papers and speeches making the case for Scottish independence.

Building a new Scotland

It is vital that the people of Scotland have the information they need to make an informed choice about Scotland’s future.

A series of papers, titled ‘Building a New Scotland’, form a prospectus for an independent Scotland.

1

Biggest Arthropleura Fossil Discovery: Unraveling an Ancient Mystery

Deep time really is a funny concept. The era in which we live, the one created by the K-Pg mass extinction, has only existed for about 66 million years.

To put that into perspective, the era before that – the Age of Reptiles – lasted for 186 million years.

The one before that – the Paleozoic – also lasted for 186 million years. Obviously start and stop points for these chunks of time are largely arbitrary.

Scientists have used major earth-shattering events – such as extinctions – as benchmarks for these major chunks of time, and they just so happen to also usher in major shifts in life and death on earth, as well as major shifts in the very makeup of the earth.

I bring up this heavy stuff because I want to show you the comparison in the lengths of some of the most well-known or talked about periods of time – such as the Carboniferous period.

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HOPETOUN HOUSE

www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk Hopetoun House Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland

Information about and images of Hopetoun House near Queensferry on Undiscovered Scotland.

Hopetoun House describes itself as "Scotland's finest stately home" and in his 1769 book "A Tour in Scotland," Thomas Pennant described the house as "The handsomest I saw in Great Britain". That's a description that many of today's visitors would probably agree with. You approach Hopetoun House from Queensferry two miles to the east. From the elaborate stone gateway, the drive slowly climbs up a carefully graded slope, and the entire majesty of the east front of the house simply rises out of the surrounding parkland as you draw close. The impact remains as powerful today as it would have been in 1769.

Hopetoun House lies close to the south shore of the River Forth, set amid well wooded parkland. It stands on ground that is high enough to give magnificent views across the river to Rosyth, and east towards the Forth Road Bridge and the Forth Rail Bridge beyond it. Yet because the ground continues to rise to the south, it is strangely retiring for a building of its size.

Hopetoun House was designed by Sir William Bruce for Charles Hope, who later became the 1st Earl of Hopetoun. Work began in 1699 and the original house was completed in 1707. The basic arrangement, of a central main house flanked by two projecting wings, is reflected in what you see today, but the 1707 house was rather smaller in scale than what was to follow.

Today's Hopetoun House is largely the result of the work of William Adam, who was commissioned in 1721 to turn an already grand and impressive house into a still grander and much more impressive one.

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Peter Stumpp: The Werewolf of Bedburg

The 1500s in Europe was a time of werewolf hysteria. No case exemplified this phenomenon more than the case of Peter Stumpp, the Werewolf of Bedburg.

Confession Under Torture

After his capture, Stumpp was tortured on a rack, eventually resulting in his confession to a number of horrific crimes. Stumpp claimed to have been practicing black magic from the time he was 12 years old. He confessed to having made a pact with the devil, who in return had given him a magic belt that allowed him to transform into "the likeness of a greedy, devouring wolf, strong and mighty, with eyes great and large, which in the night sparkled like fire, a mouth great and wide, with most sharp and cruel teeth, a huge body, and mighty paws." Removing the belt would change him back to his human form. Naturally, no belt like this was ever found after Stumpp's arrest.

Stumpp also confessed to killing and eating fourteen children and two pregnant women. For these last two, Stumpp ripped out the fetuses and ate their hearts. One of the fourteen children was Stumpp's son, whose brain Stumpp devoured.

Other Claims Against Him

There were many other claims made against Stumpp during the course of his trial. He was accused of being an "insatiable bloodsucker" for 25 years and had tried to appease his appetite by eating goats, lambs, sheep, men, women, and children.

It was claimed that he wore the skin of a wolf while hunting his victims, which would seem to invalidate the idea that he was truly a werewolf. He would sexually assault them before killing and mutilating them. It was said that one of his victims, a child, was able to escape, though it is unclear if this child might have been able to identify him afterwards.

Execution

Unsurprisingly, Stumpp was found guilty of being a werewolf and sentenced to death. His execution is often described as being one of the most brutal on record.

First, Stumpp was put on a wheel, where the flesh was torn from his body with red-hot pincers, and his arms and legs were broken with the blunt side of an axehead. After this torture, he was beheaded and burned on a pyre. Stumpp's daughter and mistress, who had been sentenced alongside him, were flayed and strangled and then burned with him.

After Stumpp was executed, the local authorities put up a pole with the torture wheel and the figure of a wolf on it. Stumpp's head was placed at the very top. Some accounts alternatively claim that a wolf's body with Stumpp's head attached to it was hung in public.

The brutal execution and display were evidently effective, as Peter Stumpp was the first and only person to be tried and executed in Bedburg for being a werewolf.

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BREAKING NEWS: INMATES TURNED INTO CATS AND ESCAPE FROM PRISON . . Police are investigating a strange case involving two suspects who allegedly shapeshifted and became cats in order to escape from the Meyerton Police Station holding in Gauteng.

The suspects, brothers Omari and Ali Mustafa, were among 11 suspects who were arrested for possession of hijacked good.

It is alleged that the two were in police holding cells when they allegedly turned into cats and escaped. The ordeal was related by an inmate who told the Warrant Officer what happened.

Omari has since been rearrested, while his brother remains on the run.

Limpopo Newspaper

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Discovery solves baffling mystery around Gulf War Illness in veterans
  • This is exactly what the research guys have concluded, whether it be dusty folks in war zones, emergency service personnel or just your ordinary, average everyday dusty dude in the street. The inflammatory response is triggered by a build up of nasties in the body, a combination of toxins, fine particulates and biological pathogens, the end result is immune dysregulation...Bingo!

  • Earth Is Running Out of Sand, Spurring a Cutthroat Black Market
  • And again, what you consider to be merely an economic issue is exactly where you seem to be missing the point.

    Quarrying is environmentally destructive. It has contamination and pollution issues. It carries health issues. As well as the costly logistics of transporting bulk around the planet. Governments these days no longer wish any company, large or small, to go around tearing rock, in any form - pre ground or otherwise -out of the ground. So your next problem would be sourcing the base materials for your manufactured product legally.

    Economically, even if you did manage to quarry,crush,sieve,grade and mix your sand for lets say £1000 a ton. What architect on the planet would specify the use of such an environmentally unfriendly and costly material and what construction company in the world would pay such a price?

    Architects are already specifying more sustainable materials and construction techniques are changeing, but at present, people are still destroying the planet and killing each other for sand ! That's the current economic situation.

  • Earth Is Running Out of Sand, Spurring a Cutthroat Black Market
  • Nobody is saying that without a time limit and at great expence sand can not be manufactured, but it is not even that simple.

    Firstly : You would have to quarry your rock of preference before crushing, sieving, grading, and more than likely, also having to transport your specific rock grains to be mixed with other types of crushed and graded chips, depending on your sands ultimate purpose.

    Secondly : It is not cheap to extract stone from the earth plus quarrying leaves very big holes in the ground! Permission from authorities to open new quarries or pits is not easily obtained in most countries.

    Thirdly: Crushing is hazardous, polluting, environmentally destructive and very expensive .

    The sand problem has been bubbling away on the back burner for years, hence the many and various ongoing efforts from all around the globe to recycle or create new and innovative construction materials.

  • Earth Is Running Out of Sand, Spurring a Cutthroat Black Market
  • Why the world is running out of sand

    Our planet is covered in it. Huge deserts from the Sahara to Arizona have billowing dunes of the stuff. Beaches on coastlines around the world are lined with sand. We can even buy bags of it at our local hardware shop for a fistful of small change.

    But believe it or not, the world is facing a shortage of sand. How can we possibly be running low on a substance found in virtually every country on earth and that seems essentially limitless?

    The problem lies in the type of sand we are using. Desert sand is largely useless to us. The overwhelming bulk of the sand we harvest goes to make concrete, and for that purpose, desert sand grains are the wrong shape. Eroded by wind rather than water, they are too smooth and rounded to lock together to form stable concrete.

    The sand we need is the more angular stuff found in the beds, banks, and floodplains of rivers, as well as in lakes and on the seashore. The demand for that material is so intense that around the world, riverbeds and beaches are being stripped bare, and farmlands and forests torn up to get at the precious grains. And in a growing number of countries, criminal gangs have moved in to the trade, spawning an often lethal black market in sand.

    https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20191108-why-the-world-is-running-out-of-sand

  • Engineered stone is now banned. But how safe are the alternatives?
  • You could be right on the governments dislike of a popular and profitable imported product!.. But what about RPE ?

    RPE will not eliminate disease in cases of extended long term exposure.

    RPE has only to be used as 'The very last resort'..and is only supposed to be used as..'The very last resort'..and only as..'The very last resort' for short periods of time, as..'The very last resort'

    Why do so many people equate the usage of respiratory protection with 'A Safe Working Environment ?'

    In areas where long term usage of such protection is required, an operatives working environment is exactly the opposite of 'SAFE' !

    There is No Known Safe Working Exposure Limit when working in respirable crystalline silica dust..NONE !

  • Aliens Now | Big Picture Science
  • Nope the link is there , just hit the thumbnail

    Why no image attached.. I do not know..Another of life's little mysteries I suppose 👽👽😳

  • Parkinson’s Linked With Industrial Solvents in Drinking Water
  • Do I sound upset ? Crikey! ha ha

    Sorry duder ,I am immune to upset and trivialities such as social media comments do not even register as irratation on my ragged toenail scale.

    I do attempt to upload the original paper where possible, but when (As is par for the course these days) the publication is behind a paywall and as in this case, without even an abstract ,then the news article has to be the option for the post.

    Take care and have an article annoyance free day .

  • Parkinson’s Linked With Industrial Solvents in Drinking Water
  • Not my headline and I did not write the article

    Here is the actual report ,crikey you have to pay for it !!.. Well what a bummer ,there is the reason for posting the news article instead of the actual report..Happy Now ?

    Large Study Links Industrial Solvent in Drinking Water to Parkinson Disease Risk in Camp Lejeune Veterans

    Neurologist Samuel Goldman, MD, MPH, had long felt obligated to dive into the question of whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that had contaminated the drinking water at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune up to the mid-1980s were associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2805182

  • Was Cleopatra a Descendant of Alexander the Great?
  • Personally I found the statement in the image below to be more informative and was probably composed by a more mature hand, at least it made me chuckle.

    As did the journalistic capabilities of the academic who wrote that article!

    Rather than let such nonsense bother you why not write for them,they pay 50/60$ per article..Can you do any worse ? Get yourself a degree and find out!

    Write for TheCollector. Join an International Community

    With over four hundred vetted junior and senior academics, we now have over 3 million monthly pageviewsc To be eligible to publish on TheCollector you must hold an educational degree in the topics you write about (Bachelor of Arts, a Master’s degree or student, or a PhD) or are a researcher or academic with a university or university-affiliated research institution.

    We pay a nominal fee of US$50-60 per article via Paypal

  • Top engineers urge action against faeces in rivers
  • It is not quite as the BBC (as usual) tries to skew the story a wholly UK wide problem, it is a problem in England simply because England has privatised water and the private utility companies involved skim the profits off the top without reinvesting in infrastructure.

    In Scotland water is nationalised ,although not perfect as there is still some farm run off and leaching along with a certain amount of storm drain overflowing during severe weather,most rivers are pretty good and there is no effluent in the drinking water.

  • UK research reveals hand car wash sector is awash with exploitation
  • I would say that slavery could perhaps be considered an occupational hazard!

    Slavery or the imprisoning /detaining personel against their will to enforce labour was once common in farming ,construction and many other industries in this country and probably still goes on.

    Gangs would (and probably still do) convince unwitting refugees to come over here to work for them on the promise of great wages and full board. Once here these people would be kept in shacks,caravans and the likes, but usually in overcrowded slum conditions, threatened with violence or beaten daily and forced to work without pay or for food (if they were lucky)

    A few years back the construction industry raised awareness of this problem and asked the workforce to be vigilant,to keep their eyes open and report any signs or suspicions of enforced labour. Thanks to this awareness campaign many of these gangs were caught and imprisoned ,thousands of illegally detained people were released... The car wash app was set up for a similar purpose

    Raising awareness on the subject of occupational hazards is not solely about RPE ,employees face many risks and many hazards...

    As for car washing ,PPE required would be waterproof footwear and clothing ,protective gloves , eye protection, a respirator for use when cleaning the inside of dirty vehicles , a respirator would also be required when the likes of chemical sprays, special waxes, sealers, body finishes or any other solvents were in use... Take care

  • Tusk claims Poles will be richer than Brits by 2029 as ‘it’s better to be in the EU’
  • Scotland voted to remain in the Tories 'Advisory' Brexit Poll The Tories used their 'Merely Advisory Poll' to drag us all out though,without consultation.

    The penny has finally dropped for the majority in England, they now know for a fact that they were sold a box completely devoid of lollipops and Brexit was simply just another Corporate Westminster Corruption con.

    I wonder if todays English and Welsh local elections might reflect this slight change of opinion by the masses ,mmmmmm?..ha ha

  • Lungs of stone: How Silica has sickened a generation of quartz cutters - The World from PRX
  • Masks are only supposed to be used as the very last resort ,it matters not a jot if you have a top of the range respirator ,in those conditions workers could put a new filter in their masks every morning and they would still be breathing in dust . No fit is ever perfect and they all leak.

    There simply should be no people working in such areas, full stop. Not even if they were kitted out with PAPR respirators and the unit had a regulator specified and fully certified LEV system running 24/7. These are areas where only machines should be employed . But once again it all comes down to production costs and profit..People are cheap. Take care ,stay safe and dust free.

  • LA City Council trio takes aim at lung disease impacting countertop workers
  • Silica is in many things and widely used everywhere, apart from the obvious dusty trades,sandblasters ,stonemasons,bricklayers,plasters,roofers,painters and decorators, demolition workers frackers ,miners, quarrymen and highway workers.

    Plumbers,electricians,refractory workers ,military personnel,tech workers ,lorry and machine drivers ,jewelers ,dental technicians ,farmers,foundry workers,glass workers,horse trainers,potters,metal grinders ,greenhouse gardeners and even teachers of old have been known to succumb to the masons cough ( Which was once known as Potters Rot )and/or one or more of the myriad of silica associated diseases .

    ( My apologies if I missed anyone out )

    Unfortunately there is no known or quantifiable safe occupational limit for silica exposure (Despite what the corporately owned politicians and regulators quote as fact ) and respirators are only supposed to be used as the very last resort ,none are 100% efficient ,they all leak ,hence the coding .

  • Do Stars Outnumber the Sands of Earth’s Beaches?
  • Q: How do you know space is infinite?

    A: How do you know it is not ?

    Conclusion : Space is infinitely unknown !

    But yes ,great to see folk not only questioning these authors and articles but actually fact checking them as well ,rather than taking what is written in any given publication at type face value, and the whole idea of this page .

  • VisitScotland to close every information centre across Scotland
  • Ay that's whit ah thought annaw Mr F ..Whit's that aw aboot ?

    The center we huv doon the street is the very first place aw the tourists head as soon as they git aff the boat ,well efter a wee visit tae the Victorian bogs that is ..

  • Building a New Scotland: An independent Scotland's Place in the World
  • Ah wis only kiddin an didnae mean ye tae answer that question..ha ha

    I did pop over regularly to Ontario until recently to visit family, all my Uncles and Aunties have since moved on to the Great Glen in the sky now though and their kids, my nephews and nieces are widely dispersed ,not only all over Canada but all around the planet.You need a satellite system to keep track of them.

    But hey,who knows ,maybe one day I shall nip over and include Nova Scotia in the tour.

    You take care and have a most excellent day.

  • Building a New Scotland: An independent Scotland's Place in the World
  • But do you class yourself as New Scottish ,New British ,Canadian or First Nations ? Ay

    I always meant to pop up there when I was visiting your beautiful country but unfortunately always seemed to run out of time . Anyway ,I hope you have a most excellent New Scottish day.. Heeeeeucht !

  • This Extremely Rare Neurological Condition Makes Faces Appear Distorted or 'Like a Demon'
  • That is exactly how my friend describes his condition only he said people just look like sheep ,which they are. The hospital gave him a yellow shield lanyard and badge to wear when he was first diagnosed which read something like 'If I do not recognise you it is because I suffer from Prosopagnosia ' He stills wears these on public transport because as he would put it " Nobody has a fuckin clue what Prosopagnosia is but they think I must be really ill so somebody usually gives me a seat ".. ha ha