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9bananas @lemmy.world
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Comments 88
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  • this is not true.

    it entirely depends on the specific application.

    there is no OS-level, standardized, dynamic allocation of RAM (definitely not on windows, i assume it's the same for OSX).

    this is because most programming languages handle RAM allocation within the individual program, so the OS can't allocate RAM however it wants.

    the OS could put processes to "sleep", but that's basically just the previously mentioned swap memory and leads to HD degradation and poor performance/hiccups, which is why it's not used much...

    so, no.

    RAM is usually NOT dynamically allocated by the OS.

    it CAN be dynamically allocated by individual programs, IF they are written in a way that supports dynamic allocation of RAM, which some languages do well, others not so much...

    it's certainly not universally true.

    also, what you describe when saying:

    Any modern OS will allocate RAM as necessary. If another application needs, it will allocate some to it.

    ...is literally swap. that's exactly what the previous user said.

    and swap is not the same as "allocating RAM when a program needs it", instead it's the OS going "oh shit! I'm out of RAM and need more NOW, or I'm going to crash! better be safe and steal some memory from disk!"

    what happens is:

    the OS runs out of RAM and needs more, so it marks a portion of the next best HD as swap-RAM and starts using that instead.

    HDs are not built for this use case, so whichever processes use the swap space become slooooooow and responsiveness suffers greatly.

    on top of that, memory of any kind is built for a certain amount of read/write operations. this is also considered the "lifespan" of a memory component.

    RAM is built for a LOT of (very fast) R/W operations.

    hard drives are NOT built for that.

    RAM has at least an order of magnitude more R/W ops going on than a hard drive, so when a computer uses swap excessively, instead of as very last resort as intended, it leads to a vastly shortened lifespan of the disk.

    for an example of a VERY stupid, VERY poor implementation of this behavior, look up the apple M1's rapid SSD degradation.

    short summary:

    apple only put 8GB of RAM into the first gen M1's, which made the OS use swap memory almost continuously, which wore out the hard drive MUCH faster than expected.

    ...and since the HD is soldered onto the Mainboard, that completely bricks the device in about half a year/year, depending on usage.

    TL;DR: you're categorically and objectively wrong about this. sorry :/

    hope you found this explanation helpful tho!

  • What is your favourite game with native Linux port?
  • the DLC are pricey, but they're also proper, old school expansions adding lots of content that actually enhances the game.

    it's perfectly playable without the DLC, and there's a LOT of DLC-sized mods on the workshop!

    kind of a fundamental problem with modern DLC: they generally don't get cheaper over time (remember when that was an actual thing? not just sales, but actually lower prices for older games?).

    if you keep up with the releases it's super okay at about 20/25€ once a year, maybe twice, bur if you're late to the party it's a whole lot of cash all at once!

    exactly why paradox introduced a subscription for Stellaris' DLCs at 10€/month... honestly kinda worth it, if you know you're just gonna play for a while and then move on...still wish stuff would just get cheaper at some point again...

  • Neverminding the evidence to the contrary.
  • ???

    except:

    • lots of land
    • feed (which requires a LOT of land)
    • massive amounts of water
    • insane amounts of antibiotics and assorted other medicine
    • stupid amounts of electricity
    • etc.

    raising cattle on a commercial scale requires mind boggling resources!

    every single study on environmental impacts of food production lists beef as the number 1 worst food source in terms of environmental impacts period.

    "Raising cattle doesn't require anything." - yeah, in fantasy land.

  • Neverminding the evidence to the contrary.
  • in case you actually want to know the answer:

    it's the avocado being shipped. and by, like, a mile and a half. it's not even close.

    raising cattle is the single most energy, water, and CO2 intensive food production there currently is.

  • FBI Arrests Man For Generating AI Child Sexual Abuse Imagery
  • and your source measured the effects of one single area that cathartic theory is supposed to apply to, not all of them.

    your source does in no way support the claim that the observed effects apply to anything other than aggressive behavior.

    i understand that the theory supposedly applies to other areas as well, but as you so helpfully pointed out: the theory doesn't seem to hold up.

    so either A: the theory is wrong, and so the association between aggression and sexuality needs to be called into question also;

    or B: the theory isn't wrong after all.

    you are now claiming that the theory is wrong, but at the same time, the theory is totally correct! (when it's convenient to you, that is)

    so which is it now? is the theory correct? then your source must be wrong irrelevant.

    or is the theory wrong? then the claim of a link between sexuality and aggression is also without support, until you provide a source for that claim.

    you can't have it both ways, but you're sure trying to.

  • FBI Arrests Man For Generating AI Child Sexual Abuse Imagery
  • you made the claim that the cathartic hypothesis is poorly supported by evidence, which you source supports, but is not relevant to the topic at hand.

    your other claim is that sexual release follows the same patterns as aggression. that's a pretty big claim! i'd like to see a source that supports that claim.

    otherwise you've just provided a source that provides sound evidence, but is also entirely off-topic...

  • FBI Arrests Man For Generating AI Child Sexual Abuse Imagery
  • your source is exclusively about aggressive behavior...

    it uses the term "arousal", which is not referring to sexual arousal, but rather a state of heightened agitation.

    provide an actual source in support of your claim, or stop spreading misinformation.

  • Patient gamers, what are your favourite city builders?
  • well, rimworld does have a focus on (micro)management and strategy!

    if your pawns are constantly down due to raiders, then you need better defenses! ...or tame a herd of animals and release those at your enemies! (rhinos work very well for this!)

    there are tons of little optimizations you can make to efficiently run a colony. for example, social fights: you can keep those from happening by keeping the problematic pawns in different areas! or removing one or both of their tongues! or sending one on basically permanent caravan missions! etc., etc.

    this kind of deep strategizing, combined with the random bullshit the game throws at you, is mostly why people love rimworld!

    and mods... definitely get mods! that's where the game reeeaaally shines!

  • Patient gamers, what are your favourite city builders?
  • re: rimworld

    it's really important to read the messages and the little bits (like the logs when a social fight occurs) to really get immersed in the story!

    might be worth watching some YouTubers playing to see what i mean!

    hazzor usually does a good job of getting into the story, so does ambiguousAmphibian

    but as the others said: if it's really not for you, then it's just not for you!

  • Never Forget
  • because the class system is built into capitalism.

    you can't have unchecked capitalism without an exploited underclass.

    and you said it has nothing to do with the economic system, which is false, hence the downvotes...

  • A Staggering 19x Energy Jump in Capacitors May Be the Beginning of the End for Batteries
  • the information age is easy: the silicon age!

    not sure about the space age...maybe titanium age? that's about the time we figured out how to machine titanium on large scales, and for highly specialized, extreme applications (talking about the SR-71 here, mostly). could also call it the alloy age, since a number of important alloys were discovered around that time

  • Helldivers 2 now has the most negative reviews among all paid games
  • steam deleted a LOT of reviews on the overwatch page at some point (probably repeatedly, probably an automated system).

    their "anti-review-bombing" measures sure love to fire when even when the community does have legitimate complaints.

    so overwatch hasn't gotten better, they just keep deleting some of the negative reviews...

  • Notes from a year of reading science fiction and fantasy [potentially minor spoilers]
  • thank you for posting!

    I've been looking for something like this, and judging by the inclusions on this list I've already read, I'm guessing I'll enjoy most of the others as well!

    now I'll be busy for the foreseeable future, which is nice :)

  • OP shares a great summary of sci-fi and fantasy books
  • thank you for posting!

    I've been looking for something like this, and judging by the inclusions on this list I've already read, I'm guessing I'll enjoy most of the others as well!

    now I'll be busy for the foreseeable future, which is nice :)