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Kashif Shah @lemmy.sdf.org
Posts 175
Comments 243
[resource] Political Typology Quiz: Where do you fit in the political typology? Are you a Faith and Flag Conservative? Progressive Left? Or somewhere in between?
  • They’re just categorically different, there isn’t an “inside” or an “outside” in the sense of spatial structure as that is something derived a posteriori as part of thought.

    So.. there are things that are either within the category of thought or not? Is thought mutually exclusive to material? Is thought composed of material or the other way around? Or are they both the same?

    I’m not sure what it would even mean to say reality is “thought”.

    That is the standard definition of idealism, is it not? That existence is immaterial?

  • [2024-07-11] Human Rights @ SDF Community Update

    Hello all of you subscribers! Your appreciative moderator, here, with a quick message.

    This community was formed approx. a month ago. I didn't expect there to be much activity, but I was hopeful that some solid groundwork it might take off, as the time is right for human rights.

    There are now 76 of us subscribed. People other than myself have started posting, which is great to see. We've started to see some comments coming in, which is also great to see.

    I spent a couple of weeks laying some groundwork posts and then slowed down a little the last couple of weeks, but I think it will be sustainable for me to keep a steady, slow trickle of posts going.

    This is my first time moderating an online community, so please bear with me as I learn how to keep a community happy and engaged!

    Thank you for taking the time to read this and to care about human rights.

    0
    www.voanews.com China defends its human rights record at UN meeting

    UN Human Rights Council session was mainly focused on China's treatment of Uyghurs

    China defends its human rights record at UN meeting

    archive.org link

    > Chen Xu, China's ambassador to the U.N. in Geneva, said at the meeting, attended by a delegation of Chinese diplomats and officials, that recommendations rejected by China were "politically motivated based on disinformation, ideologically biased or interfering in China's traditional sovereignty." He condemned what he called an attempt to "smear and attack" China.

    > China has drawn much criticism over the years for its treatment and detention of Uyghurs and other Muslims. A 2022 U.N. report, published by former U.N. rights chief Michelle Bachelet, said China's treatment of Uyghurs could constitute crimes against humanity, something China has consistently denied.

    > Thursday's review of China's human rights record before the Human Rights Council was the first since the publication of the 2022 report. ... Each U.N. member state undergoes a review of its human rights record every few years.

    1

    Growth is enriching an elite and killing the planet. We need an economy based on human rights

    www.theguardian.com Growth is enriching an elite and killing the planet. We need an economy based on human rights | Olivier De Schutter

    Economic growth allows the few to grow ever-wealthier. Ending poverty and environmental catastrophe demands fresh thinking

    Growth is enriching an elite and killing the planet. We need an economy based on human rights | Olivier De Schutter

    archive.org link

    > A “human rights economy” can deliver for people and the planet because it shifts our focus from growth to humanity – grounding the purpose of the economy in fundamental, universal human values. It offers human rights as a guardrail to keep the economy on track – meeting the challenges of the climate crisis, addressing inequalities and eradicating poverty.

    > This proposition is not some fairytale. Concrete steps can be taken now, starting with choosing measures of progress other than gross domestic product (GDP) – which tells us nothing about the ecological or social fallout of economic activity.

    > And we need to start valuing what really counts. GDP has no way of accounting for the estimated 16.4bn hours spent every day worldwide on unpaid work, largely carried out by women, that underpins the global economy: caring for children, people with disabilities and older citizens.

    2
    Julian’s first birthday in freedom in fourteen years.
  • Language like that plus the failure to treat the subject of discussion to dignity was almost enough for me to remove this comment, on it's own. Thankfully, the community has spoken using the tools available to them to indicate that your behavior is unacceptable. Keep it up and you'll be removed.

  • www.hrw.org Israel/Palestine: All Victims Have Right to Reparation for Abuses

    Human Rights Watch on June 26 submitted recommendations to the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967. All victims of gross human rights violations in Palestine and Israel are owed reparation.

    Israel/Palestine: All Victims Have Right to Reparation for Abuses

    archive.today link

    > All victims of gross human rights violations in Palestine and Israel are owed reparation, Human Rights Watch said today. Human Rights Watch on June 26 submitted recommendations to the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967. The rapporteur, Francesca Albanese, had invited input to inform her October 2024 report to the United Nations General Assembly on the ongoing hostilities.

    > Under international law, governments responsible for abuses are obliged to provide effective remedies for human rights violations, including through truth, justice, compensation, memorialization, and guarantees of non-recurrence. Non-state armed groups also have responsibilities to provide reparation. Reparation processes should center on the rights of victims and be carried out after meaningful and effective consultations with them. Other countries that have, or whose businesses have, supported one side or the other should contribute to reparations and all other countries should press the parties to the conflict to commit to provide reparations.

    > “The parties to the conflict need to repair the harm they have caused to victims in the ongoing hostilities,” said Clive Baldwin, senior legal adviser at Human Rights Watch. “Governments supporting Israel and Palestinian armed groups should not only use their leverage to stop further abuses, but also to ensure that victims and survivors receive meaningful reparations.”

    0
    eng.belta.by Belarus, Russia issue joint report on human rights situation in certain countries

    The Ministries of Foreign Affairs of Belarus and Russia have prepared the first joint report on the human rights situation in certain countries. The document was published on the websites of the foreign ministries on the morning of 20 June

    Belarus, Russia issue joint report on human rights situation in certain countries

    archive.org link

    > The Ministries of Foreign Affairs of Belarus and Russia have prepared the first joint report on the human rights situation in certain countries. The document was published on the websites of the foreign ministries on the morning of 20 June, BelTA has learned.

    > The review covers more than 40 countries. Among them are many EU countries (including the closest neighbors of Belarus), the UK, the United States, Canada, Japan, Australia and New Zealand, Ukraine, Moldova and others.

    > A very detailed fact-finding report has been prepared for every country. As visual confirmation, the document has numerous photos. The document is large, more than 1,800 pages long!

    > Addresses to readers were written by Belarusian Minister of Foreign Affairs Yuri Ambrazevich and Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Vershinin. As they noted, the facts the Report contains show that racist and neo-colonial views are typical of Western "model democracies" in principle.

    0
    www.nytimes.com Russia Committed Human Rights Violations in Crimea, European Court Finds

    The European Court of Human Rights listed multiple violations. Its findings paint a grim picture of life under a decade of Russian occupation.

    Russia Committed Human Rights Violations in Crimea, European Court Finds

    archive.today link

    > Evidence cited in the ruling showed how Russia, and its proxy government in the region, have created an atmosphere of oppression, using blanket laws targeting extremism and terrorism to silence dissent. Pro-Ukrainian media outlets have been abolished, while the Ukrainian language has been suppressed in schools. Ukrainian banks have been nationalized, along with their customers’ property and assets, the court found.

    > Crimean Tatars, an ethnic minority, have also been targeted, and between 15,000 and 30,000 Tatar have fled the region since 2014. Tatar television channels have been removed from the air, their cultural and religious buildings vandalized and some Tatar homes have been painted with crosses. Any gatherings by Tatar leaders or groups deemed pro-Ukrainian have been violently broken up, with attendees detained.

    > Crimea’s occupying government has also cracked down on religious diversity, raiding madrassas and mosques, expelling Ukrainian Orthodox priests and repurposing their churches. Journalists critical of the regime are also routinely harassed and threatened.

    0
    www.techpolicy.press The Promise and Perils of Human Rights for Governing Digital Platforms: Symposium Introduction | TechPolicy.Press

    This symposium seeks to problematize assumptions that human rights are the natural legal and normative framework for platform governance.

    The Promise and Perils of Human Rights for Governing Digital Platforms: Symposium Introduction | TechPolicy.Press

    archive.org link

    > Yet while human rights offer a salient language of social justice, it is unclear whether they are legally and conceptually adequate to address the most important political, social and economic questions and conflicts raised by the platformization of social life. Critical literature suggests that the individualized, state-oriented legal protections and non-confrontational language of human rights have historically been as likely to stabilize state and corporate power as to challenge it. Moreover, technology regulation scholars argue that greater attention should be directed towards how digital platforms are transforming the material and socio-technical environments that constitute the conditions of possibility for realizing human rights in practice.

    0
    Reclaiming Democracy With Bitcoin At The Oslo Freedom Forum
  • Interesting that this is being downvoted.

    It would be great if someone could articulate the negative sentiment towards bitcoin.

    As a former software developer, and someone who has briefly experimented with the blockchains, I can say that the technology is vastly over-hyped and completely misunderstood.

    Can Human Rights be furthered by use of blockchains? It's quite possible.

    But what use is there focusing on the simplest of use cases: bitcoin?

  • laughingsquid.com Non-Verbal Autistic Woman Embraces Technology to Advocate for Disability Rights

    CBS Mornings sat down with Jordyn Zimmerman, a non-verbal autistic woman who uses technology to be an advocate for disability rights.

    Non-Verbal Autistic Woman Embraces Technology to Advocate for Disability Rights
    0
    www.hrw.org Global Failures on Healthcare Funding

    New data from the World Health Organization shows that many governments around the world did not meet public healthcare spending benchmarks amid the Covid-19 pandemic. The new information indicates possible violations of countries’ obligations to the human right to health.

    Global Failures on Healthcare Funding

    archive.org link

    > “When governments neglect to invest in their healthcare systems, people and families end up shouldering the burden,” said Matt McConnell, economic justice and rights researcher at Human Rights Watch. “While more spending is not enough on its own to ensure universal access to high quality healthcare services, it can help shift this burden, which causes the most harm for people with the fewest resources.”

    > The Human Rights Watch analysis of healthcare spending in more than 190 countries around the world, available in a summary table at the end of this document, also found that:

    > Despite a mass increase in healthcare spending across the globe in response to the pandemic, 38 governments spent less on health care in 2021, as a share of their GDP, than the year before it began.

    > Despite governments’ commitments to reduce out-of-pocket expenditures, individuals and their households collectively paid the equivalent of about US$1.68 trillion for health care out of their own pockets in 2021, a figure comparable to the annual GDP of Australia or the Republic of Korea.

    > At the height of the pandemic, out-of-pocket payments covered the costs of more than 20 percent of health care in 119 countries. Only high-income countries averaged less than 20 percent in 2021 (17 percent), while upper-middle (29.9 percent), lower-middle (34.6 percent), and low-income (39.1 percent) countries averaged far more.

    > In 47 countries in 2021, individuals and their households collectively paid more out-of-pocket for health care than their governments spent on it.

    > Twenty years after agreeing to the Abuja Declaration and committing to spend at least 15 percent of their national budgets on health care, only 2 of the African Union’s 55 member countries met this target in 2021: Cabo Verde (15.75 percent) and South Africa (15.29 percent). On the whole, countries in the African Union spent an average of 7.35 percent of their national budgets on health care that year.

    > Eighty-three governments paid more per person to service their external public and publicly guaranteed debts in 2021 than on health care.

    0
    [opinion] Mental health must be upheld as a universal human right
  • Indeed, it is:

    https://lemmy.sdf.org/post/18443730 <- universal healthcare and human rights

    The right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health[10]—a right that practically all countries have committed to uphold

    Except, the United States still hasn't ratified.

    https://lemmy.sdf.org/post/17662154 <- map of who hasn't ratified

    https://lemmy.sdf.org/post/17841177 <- easy-to-read ICESCR

  • [opinion] Mental health must be upheld as a universal human right

    www.aljazeera.com Mental health must be upheld as a universal human right

    As multiple crises are putting mental health under pressure, people must be guaranteed the right to better care.

    Mental health must be upheld as a universal human right

    archive.org link

    > Multiplying and escalating crises are placing ever greater strains on people’s mental health and the services available to support them. From the lingering effects of COVID-19, the uptick in climate-related emergencies and the ongoing impacts of conflict and displacement in many regions, more and more people are suffering. Meanwhile, stigma and discrimination against people with mental health conditions and psychosocial disabilities continue in our schools, workplaces and communities.

    > With as many as one billion people – one in eight of us – living with a mental health condition, and a persistent history of under-investment in mental health services, the gap between the need for and availability of quality care and support can be expected to widen further. This will have predictable consequences for the health, happiness and wellbeing of millions of people.

    3
    news.un.org Healthcare: Lack of universal coverage, ‘human rights tragedy on a massive scale’

    World leaders on Thursday agreed to boost efforts to provide universal health coverage for all by 2030.

    Healthcare: Lack of universal coverage, ‘human rights tragedy on a massive scale’

    archive.org link

    > Ultimately, achieving health coverage for all is a political choice, said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the UN World Health Organization (WHO).

    > “But the choice is not just made on paper. It is made in budget decisions and policy decisions. Most of all, it is made by investing in primary healthcare, which is the most inclusive, equitable, and efficient path to universal health coverage,” he emphasized.

    0

    [resource] OHCHR overview on Universal Health Coverage and the Right to Health

    archive.today link

    > Human rights are fundamental and universal rights inherent to all human beings, regardless of nationality, ethnic origin, age or any other status without which they cannot live a dignified life. These principles should be at the center of all public policies and practices, including, as WHO’s Constitution recognizes, those related to health and health care.9 But human rights norms and standards are not just widely accepted: human rights treaties create specific legal obligations for member states that have ratified them to respect, protect, and fulfil these rights in the development and implementation of laws, policies and programs. The right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health10—a right that practically all countries have committed to uphold—articulates numerous concrete obligations for States relevant to UHC, thus making UHC an expression of an important dimension of this right. Among others, it requires that States ensure the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of health services. Some of these obligations and principles are discussed below.

    0

    [resource] Human Rights FAQs

    www.cesr.org Human Rights FAQs

    FAQ on economic, social, and cultural rights

    Human Rights FAQs

    archive.today link

    > What are human rights? How do they relate to the economy? Why are they a powerful tool for systemic transformation? Here, you can find short, digestible answers to commonly asked questions about human rights and the economy.

    0
    www.cesr.org Breaking barriers, building bridges: pioneering gender equality in a Rights-Based Economy

    Explore how a Rights-Based Economy can strengthen gender equality on June 19. Register now!

    Breaking barriers, building bridges: pioneering gender equality in a Rights-Based Economy

    archive.today link

    > We are excited to invite you to our upcoming webinar to explore how a Rights-Based Economy can challenge the neoliberal model through an intersectional lens.

    > Register to join a diverse group of allies to discuss human rights tools that strengthen gender equality, and how shifting narratives through research can open the way to systems change.

    > Date: Wednesday, 19 June 2024

    > Time: 12 PM GMT, 7 PM MYT, 7 AM ET

    > Languages: English, Spanish

    > Speakers:

    > Nelly Shiguango, Federation of Indigenous Organizations of Napo, Ecuador

    > Jessica Mandanda, Feminist Macro-Economic Alliance Malawi

    > Eva Martínez-Acosta, Centro de Derechos Económicos y Sociales (CDES)

    > Amna Terrass, Observatoire Tunisien de l'Economie (OTE)

    > Moderator:

    > Nicole Maloba , African Women's Development and Communication Network (FEMNET)

    > We look forward to seeing you there!

    0

    archive.org link

    > Human rights defenders and government critics continue to face persecution.

    > In January, authorities released human rights lawyer Tang Jitian after forcibly disappearing him for 398 days. In March, a Guangxi court sentenced human rights lawyer Qin Yongpei to five years in prison for “inciting subversion of state power.” In April, a court in Shandong province sentenced prominent legal scholar Xu Zhiyong and human rights lawyer Ding Jiaxi to 14 and 12 years in prison, respectively, for “subversion of state power.”

    0

    archive.org link

    > ...

    > Beijing and Hong Kong authorities continued their assault on human rights in the territory, a downward trajectory that is expected to continue as Beijing appointed an abusive former police official, John Lee, as the city’s chief executive.

    > International attention to Chinese government human rights violations grew. Eight governments engaged in a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics in protest. In June, entry into force of the United States Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act established a presumption that goods from Xinjiang are made from forced labor and cannot be imported. In August, the former United Nations high commissioner for human rights released her report on Xinjiang, concluding that the abuses in the region “may constitute crimes against humanity.”

    > ...

    0

    UN report details ‘climate of fear’ in occupied areas of Ukraine, as the Russian Federation moves to cement control

    archive.org link

    > The Russian Federation has created a stifling climate of fear in occupied areas of Ukraine, committing widespread violations of international humanitarian and human rights law in an effort to consolidate its control over the population living there, according to a UN Human Rights Office report issued today.

    > The report, based on more than 2,300 interviews with victims and witnesses, details the measures taken by the Russian Federation to impose Russian language, citizenship, laws, court system, and education curricula on the occupied areas, while at the same time suppressing expressions of Ukrainian culture and identity, and dismantling Ukraine’s governance and administrative systems in these regions.

    > “The actions of the Russian Federation have ruptured the social fabric of communities and left individuals isolated, with profound and long-lasting consequences for Ukrainian society as a whole,” said UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk.

    0

    Russian rights commissioner calls for swift release of Russians held by Hamas

    archive.today link

    > Russia's Human Rights Commissioner said on Tuesday she had issued a fresh appeal to senior U.N. and other officials to take action to secure the release of Russian nationals still held by Hamas in the Gaza Strip. Tatyana Moskalkova, writing on the Telegram messaging app, said she had launched the appeal after meeting in Moscow with relatives of those still being held.

    > "In one conversation, one of the mothers told me details of the situation of those being held," she wrote. News reports have put at eight the number of hostages holding Russian passports, including three who were released.

    > Moskalkova said she had appealed to the U.N. High Commissioner For Human Rights, Volker Turk, the head of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Mirjana Spoljaric, and other officials "for the rapid return home of our compatriots".

    0

    [opinion] Building new alliances: a path to social justice

    archive.org link

    > According to Türk, a human rights economy framework “ensures that business models and economic policies are guided by human rights standards and enables an integrated and mission-oriented combination of socio-economic policies that advance each and every SDG goal and target, including in particular by ending discrimination against women and girls, as well as racial, ethnic and linguistic minorities.”

    > It also advances a fairer distribution of resources that reduces inequalities within and between countries, Türk said.

    > “A human rights economy is one in which core human rights goals and methods infuse every policy and decision-making process, including taxation, investment and all issues of resource allocation in Government budgets,” he said.

    0
    The climate crisis is solvable, but human rights must trump profits
  • This is the human rights community, so I’d be interested to hear what people think about, say, a third-world farmer using slash-and-burn agriculture to meet their basic needs.

    A simplification of the question, from a human rights perspective is 1) does a given activity cause injustice for the human rights of others? and 2) is the actor within their rights to perform said activity?

    Based on the little that I've read about slash-and-burn agriculture, it appears to be a sustainable choice for growing populations, but it is not sustainable for large populations. Also, that is apparently a fairly well understand farming technique, historically speaking. So it might be safe to say, that in this third-world, subsistence situation, the answer to 1) might be no and 2) might be yes.

    One of the Human Rights is the right to work, so yes, sometimes human rights-based approaches will align with profit motives as equally as it will with environmental motives. What a human rights-based approach does not allow for, however, is letting profit motives overpower environmental motives.

  • Exxon Mobil predicts global temperature increase over 2 degrees Celsius by 2050
  • This is relevant:

    https://lemmy.sdf.org/post/17719095

    What China is doing is premised on the idea that global warming is inevitable, so it is best to prepare protections for the people. The linked article goes into detail about their massive earthworks and waterworks projects.

  • Supreme Court: Are bans on homeless camps 'cruel and unusual' punishment?
  • Over half a million people are estimated to be homeless in the United States on any given night

    Seems relatively obvious to me that the courts can't handle this one and we need congress to act. Ratification of the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) would require congress to write domestic laws to incorporate a core subset of the UN UDHR human rights.

    #homeless #homelessness #houseless #houselessness

    #politics #usa

    #unudhr #humanrights

    #voteyourconscience

  • [resource] The human right to adequate housing: Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing
    1. The true reunification of the right to life and the right to adequate housing, however, can only be accomplished by a global response, led by States, including their legislatures and courts, by human rights institutions and by civil society.
    1. States must address issues of inadequate housing and homelessness and name them as core human rights issues linked to the right to life — in domestic law and policy and in international initiatives, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the New Urban Agenda. States must also conduct a thorough examination of legislation, court practice and public policies to ensure that the right to life is not restricted to a negative rights framework. States must formally recognize that the right to life includes the right to a place to live in dignity and security, free of violence, and ensure access to justice for all victims of violations of the right to life, including those linked to homelessness and inadequate housing. Governments must ensure the effective integration of housing policy and social protection with human rights frameworks, mechanisms and institutions, so that housing policy is properly framed around the implementation of core human rights obligations, and access to effective remedies is incorporated in programme design and implementation.

    Contents

    Page

    I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

    II. Unearthing the connections: life, security, dignity and housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

    A. Homelessness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

    B. Informal settlements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

    C. Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

    D. Natural disasters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

    E. Post-conflict situations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

    F. Financial and housing crises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

    G. Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

    H. Independent living and institutionalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

    III. Human rights law: the right to life and the right to housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

    IV. Towards a more inclusive understanding of the right to life and the right to adequate housing 15

    A. Draft general comment No. 36 of the Human Rights Committee on the right to life . . . . 15

    B. Other treaty bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

    C. Regional jurisprudence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

    D. Domestic jurisprudence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

    V. The way forward: conclusions and strategic recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22