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British Columbia

  • nanaimonewsnow.com Island community fly-bys being planned ahead of final flight for Hawaii Mars

    PORT ALBERNI - Last minute preparations are being made to the famous Hawaii Mars water bomber ahead of it's fi...

    Island community fly-bys being planned ahead of final flight for Hawaii Mars
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  • Largest B.C. park in a decade set up to protect caribou herds

    > The Ministry of Environment says in a statement that the addition to the Klinse-za Park will make it the largest provincial park established in the province in a decade. > > The park addition is the result of a partnership in 2020 between the province and the Saulteau and West Moberly First Nations, where they agreed to help stabilize and protect the threatened southern mountain caribou. > > Klinse-za Park is located just west of Chetwynd, B.C., almost 1,100 kilometres north of Vancouver.

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  • www.nelsonstar.com B.C. premier tells app-based firms to 'suck it up' over new rules

    Premier David Eby tells app-based companies to suck it up over new rules

    B.C. premier tells app-based firms to 'suck it up' over new rules

    B.C. Premier David Eby says app-based companies employing ride-hail and food-delivery workers can "suck it up" as new, first-in-Canada rules come into effect this fall.

    The provincial government Wednesday announced news regulations protecting gig workers. Starting Sept. 3 companies like Uber and DoorDash will have to pay 120 per cent of the provincial minimum wage to their employees while working — $20.88 per hour. Ride-hail and food-delivery workers will also see their tips protected and they will become eligible for workers compensation benefits as part of other measures designed to create safe working environments.

    The broad coordinates of the legislation became public in the fall, but yesterday's announcement prompted another round of concerns from the companies themselves and business leaders at large.

    Bridgitte Anderson, president and CEO of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade, said in a statement that B.C. companies already contend with some of the highest costs and strictest regulatory and tax environments in North America.

    "We are concerned that the new regulations will impose additional burdens and reduce flexibility, inevitably leading to even higher costs for transportation and food delivery services," Anderson said. She also fears that companies will hand out fewer assignments to workers to cut their costs.

    But Eby does not buy it.

    "These companies can suck it up. They will be alright, they will be fine," he said Thursday (June 13 during an unrelated event with Newfoundland Premier Andrew Furey." The companies that employ these ride-hail and food-delivery workers make billions while the workers themselves often live right at the edge, (British Columbians) don't want a scenario where their food is delivered on the backs of someone, who is looking at homelessness and using a food bank to subsidize the delivery charge," he said.

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  • bc.ctvnews.ca Uber calls B.C. gig-worker wages, job protections 'unreasonable'

    Ride-hailing company Uber is slamming the British Columbia government's decision to impose minimum wages and basic labour protections for gig workers, saying the province is set to drive up costs for residents and drive down demand for local businesses.

    Uber calls B.C. gig-worker wages, job protections 'unreasonable'

    Uber's reply to the new laws.

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  • www.nelsonstar.com Minimum wage, other rules for B.C. app-based ride and delivery work

    Province says first such regulations in Canada come into effect this September

    Minimum wage, other rules for B.C. app-based ride and delivery work

    British Columbia has finalized regulations to provide a minimum-wage and basic protections for ride-hailing and delivery workers using app-based platforms such as Uber, DoorDash and SkipTheDishes.

    The Ministry of Labour says in a statement the regulations that will take effect on Sept. 3 are a first in Canada.

    It says the changes are the result of years of engagement with various stakeholders, and they address workers’ top concerns, including low and unpredictable pay, tip protection and lack of workers’ compensation.

    The new rules set the minimum wage for the time a worker is engaged in a job at $20.88 per hour, 20 per cent higher than B.C.’s general minimum wage.

    The province says the rationale for adding the premium is that the minimum wage does not apply to the workers’ time spent waiting between assignments.

    The rules will also ensure 100 per cent of customers’ tips go to the worker and establish a 35- to 45-cent minimum per-kilometre vehicle allowance to help workers cover their expenses, as well as coverage through B.C.’s workers’ compensation agency.

    The regulations will also require platforms to show workers the locations and estimated pay for a particular job before they accept it, and the companies must provide a reason if a worker is suspended or terminated from their position.

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  • www.chemainusvalleycourier.ca B.C. blows past country with new construction in April 2024

    B.C. leads Canada among provinces in value of building permits, new units in April 2024

    B.C. blows past country with new construction in April 2024

    > Building permits issued B.C. in April 2024 totalled 3.13 billion -- up $1.4 billion from March -- and created a record-high 7,521 residential units — up almost 78 per cent compared to the previous month. Based on these figures, B.C. accounted for almost 28 per cent of all new residential units in the country in April. > > Much of the growth happened on the multi-residential side. Of the new residential units created in April 2024, 95 per cent were multi-residential units.

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  • www.pqbnews.com B.C.'s first commercial electric flight to make history June 14

    Sealand Flight is offering a contest for Canada's first commercial electric flight in Campbell River

    B.C.'s first commercial electric flight to make history June 14

    > On June 14, Sealand's Pipistrel Velis Electro will take flight for an introductory flight lesson. It will be the first time a person can purchase a commercial flight on an electric aircraft in Canada. The student will be allowed to operate the aircraft under the guidance of the flight instructor. > > Sealand Flight is hosting a contest to find a person for the training flight.

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  • Drug Compassion Club Organizers Face Criminal Charges. What Now?

    thetyee.ca Drug Compassion Club Organizers Face Criminal Charges. What Now? | The Tyee

    Jeremy Kalicum and Eris Nyx have been charged with trafficking. They’re fundraising for a long legal battle.

    Drug Compassion Club Organizers Face Criminal Charges. What Now? | The Tyee

    Lawyers for Eris Nyx and Jeremy Kalicum, the founders of a compassion club supplying tested heroin, meth and cocaine to users, say they were shocked prosecutors laid drug trafficking charges against the two while a related case is before the courts.

    At Emily Carr University, the User Experience Design Certificate program equips students to tackle the dynamic demands of a fast-developing industry.

    DULF — the Drug Users Liberation Front — had applied to Health Canada for an exemption from Canada’s Controlled Drugs and Substances Act in order to run the compassion club.

    The request was denied and DULF is challenging the decision in Federal Court.

    “We also were surprised that, given our clients’ life-saving efforts, there would be a public interest in prosecuting such efforts,” said Stephanie Dickson, lawyer for Nyx and Kalicum.

    Since 2020, Nyx and Kalicum have held protest events and supplied tested heroin, cocaine and meth to drug users, despite the risk of arrest for breaking Canada’s controlled substances laws.

    The pair ordered the drugs from sellers on the dark web, then tested them before distributing them to a small group of people who are addicted and at high risk of death from illicit toxic drugs.

    Nyx and Kalicum previously told The Tyee they were driven to start the compassion club after losing friends and neighbours, and after responding to dozens of overdoses.

    They said they bought drugs from suppliers on the dark web because there was no legal source for prescription-grade heroin in Canada.

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  • www.thefreepress.ca New B.C. law aimed at finding labour shortage relief from abroad

    New law coming into effect next month promises to relief labour shortages in health care and other fields

    New B.C. law aimed at finding labour shortage relief from abroad

    > "The Premier gave me the task to get the International Credentials Recognition Act across the finish line, and I'm happy to say we've done it,” said Ravi Parmar, Parliamentary Secretary for International Credentials. “For too long, skilled professionals from around the world have come to our province hoping for a better life, only to find roadblocks in their way. But now, with these regulations, we're changing that. It means simpler, fairer rules so these professionals can start working in their fields faster, providing the services our communities need.” https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2024PSFS0022-000907

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  • www.wltribune.com Right-wing political split not welcomed by B.C. business leaders

    Business community looking at Conservative/United choice with some concern

    Right-wing political split not welcomed by B.C. business leaders
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  • 2 hospitalized after seaplane goes down in Vancouver: officials

    Two people have been hospitalized after a seaplane collided with a boat in Vancouver's Coal Harbour near Stanley Park on Saturday, officials confirmed.

    A CBC reporter on the scene, near Canada Place, confirmed that rescue boats were circling a small plane in the water near Brockton Point in Stanley Park.

    The Vancouver Police Department (VPD) said in a statement that a Harbour Air seaplane collided with a pleasure boat in the water around 1 p.m. PT.

    "A number of people were on board both the plane and boat," the VPD said. "Several passengers have been treated for injuries and taken to hospital."

    The VPD did not confirm exactly how many people were injured, but said more details would come as the investigation progresses.

    On Sunday morning, Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services assistant chief Jarret Gray confirmed that two people on the boat were hospitalized with their injuries.

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  • B.C. politicians debate reflooding Sumas Prairie - New UBC report says restoring the lake would help with climate adaptation

    > Much of the Sumas Prairie was once a shallow, freshwater lake until the B.C. government drained it in the 1920s, converting it into agricultural land for settlers and displacing the Sumas First Nation. > > The report says buying back the estimated 1,375 properties on the lakebed is a solution that is projected to cost around $1 billion, less than half of the estimated $2.4 billion cost of repairing dikes and installing a new pump station.

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  • Editorial: Provincial politicians need to decide where loyalties lie | Times Colonist

    www.timescolonist.com Editorial: Provincial politicians need to decide where loyalties lie

    The Oct. 19 provincial election could be one of those rare watershed elections, like the ones in 1941, 1952, 1972, 1991 and 2017.

    Editorial: Provincial politicians need to decide where loyalties lie
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  • www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com B.C. replacing existing fleet of air ambulance airplanes

    Premier says new air ambulances are part of $673M in provincial funding over 10 years

    B.C. replacing existing fleet of air ambulance airplanes

    >Premier David Eby announced Friday (June 7) that BC Emergency Health Services is replacing its existing fleet with 12 new Beechcraft King Air 360CHW air ambulances. Several of those have been in operation since May 1, and the full new fleet will be in operation by next fall, he said.

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  • Fleeing the Fire at the Keefer Rooms

    thetyee.ca Fleeing the Fire at the Keefer Rooms | The Tyee

    Three tenants on their harrowing escape, and what it takes to rebuild a model home in the Downtown Eastside. A special Tyee report.

    Fleeing the Fire at the Keefer Rooms | The Tyee

    Steve Nelson didn’t see any sign of fire when the alarm went off at noon at the Keefer Rooms.

    He looked out the door of his room into the third-floor hallway. No one was fleeing. No one was calling for help. It must’ve been triggered by cigarette smoke or burnt toast, he thought.

    The Keefer Rooms was a four-storey brick building built in 1913. Residents of the upper levels had bay windows, painted green, with a view of Keefer Street. The ground level was home to the Gain Wah restaurant, where beautiful pieces of barbecued pork always hung in the window, a comforting sight that drew hungry locals from Chinatown and the nearby Downtown Eastside to stop for an affordable bite.

    It was September 2022. It had been a bad year for old buildings in Vancouver, with many fires and even a few deaths. False alarms, however, were common. The Tyee is supported by readers like you Join us and grow independent media in Canada

    But the alarm wouldn’t stop ringing, so Nelson and one of his neighbours on the floor stepped out to the fire escape. They spotted people on the roof of the shiny condo building across the alley, a modern addition to the neighbourhood called the Flats, trying to get their attention.

    “Your building’s on fire!” they yelled.

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  • The healing power of fire

    thenarwhal.ca Using fire to heal the land — and mitigate B.C. wildfires | The Narwhal

    On Gitanyow lands, a cultural burn done with the BC Wildfire Service is part of a growing effort to mitigate wildfires and strengthen communities

    Using fire to heal the land — and mitigate B.C. wildfires | The Narwhal

    Gitanyow Elder Darlene Vegh drips fire onto a patch of dry leaves, moss and twigs on a ridge above Xsit’ax (Kitwanga River) on Wilp Gwaas Hlaam lands in northwest B.C. It’s a clear spring day a few weeks after the winter snowmelt exposed the forest floor. The orange light of the little flames dancing along the ground is soft and warm against the deep shadows cast by the trees. Vegh’s fire starts the day’s cultural burn, an Indigenous-led practice that brings fire back to the land in a good way.

    Fire — called lakw in Simalgyax, the language spoken in Gitanyow — was used on the landscape for thousands of years as a tool to manage resources like food and medicinal plants and the animals that eat them. But under colonization, Indigenous use of fire was banned — suppressed along with every other aspect of cultural life. As governments enacted genocidal policies like the Indian Act, they used fire for nefarious purposes, burning down Indigenous dwellings as they forcibly removed communities from their lands and moved them onto reserves.

    Vegh is from Wilp Wii Litsxw, a Gitanyow house group. She’s a member of the Gitanyow Lax’yip Guardians, a small group of fish and wildlife monitors known as the “eyes and ears” of the territory, or lax’yip. When the guardians surveyed the ridge to map the area for cultural values prior to the burn, she says they discovered seven house pits and dozens of cache pits, depressions in the ground where homes or food storage buildings once stood. She wondered why they didn’t see cedar boards — remnants of house construction — or other evidence of ancestral use of the land.

    “I think they were all burned by the state, the churches or the Indian agents, when the Indian reserve systems were established — 1918 would have been a devastating year for ancestral habitation sites,” she says, referring to the time when settlers moved en masse onto Gitanyow lands, enabled by an amendment to the Indian Act that allowed expropriation of reserve land for farmers and ranchers.

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  • bc.ctvnews.ca 24% year-over-year decrease in toxic drug deaths: B.C. coroner

    Dozens more people died from unregulated, toxic drugs in B.C. this April, the latest data from the BC Coroners Service shows.

    24% year-over-year decrease in toxic drug deaths: B.C. coroner
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  • www.pqbnews.com B.C. D-Day vet presented France’s highest honour for help in liberation

    Joseph Vogelgesang, 99, decorated as a Knight of the Legion of Honour for the liberation of France

    B.C. D-Day vet presented France’s highest honour for help in liberation

    > A statement from the Consulate General of France in Vancouver says Vogelgesang will be decorated as a Knight of the Legion of Honour to acknowledge his contribution and bravery in the liberation of France.

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  • www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com New legislation opens up possibility of 3,600 new housing units in Duncan

    The move impacts 900 properties mainly in Cairnsmore, Marchmont areas

    New legislation opens up possibility of 3,600 new housing units in Duncan

    > City zoning was restricted to single-unit and two-unit, or duplex, dwellings, on these low-density residential properties, but the province made mandatory legislative changes in December in an effort to produce more housing in British Columbia at an accelerated pace to deal with the ongoing housing crisis.

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  • nanaimonewsnow.com B.C. appoints chief scientific adviser for complex mental health, addiction needs

    VANCOUVER - British Columbia has announced the appointment of a chief scientific adviser to address a "growing...

    B.C. appoints chief scientific adviser for complex mental health, addiction needs

    > “He’ll advise us on new tools and give us advice to help this very specific group of people so they get the help they need, and our communities are safe and healthy for everyone,” Eby told a news conference Wednesday.

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  • Researchers sailing to underwater earthquake swarm site off coastal B.C. to last 3 weeks and be live-streamed

    www.pqbnews.com Researchers sailing to underwater earthquake swarm site off coastal B.C.

    Ocean Exploration Trust expedition to Juan De Fuca Ridge to last 3 weeks and be live-streamed

    Researchers sailing to underwater earthquake swarm site off coastal B.C.

    cross-posted from: https://lemmy.ca/post/22628905

    Every couple of years the EVNautilus comes to explore and to place and replace monitoring experiments. If you like SlowTV ([email protected]) then this is great television.

    > The Nautilus will be at sea for 21 days after disembarking from the Canadian Coast Guard docks in North Saanich on June 6. The ship will boast a crew of over 50, including scientists, marine technicians, engineers, and science communicators, and there will be little downtime when out at sea.

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  • After disaster strikes, how much is it worth to rebuild?

    thenarwhal.ca Reflooding Sumas Lake recommended by researchers | The Narwhal

    City of Abbotsford says managed retreat from Sumas Lake is not under consideration, despite new study

    Reflooding Sumas Lake recommended by researchers | The Narwhal

    Some of the most fertile land in southern B.C.’s Fraser Valley is the former lake-bed of Semá:th Xhotsa (Sumas Lake), where water has been held back for a century. The region, which once supported an ancient Indigenous food system, has been home to farms and ranches since it was drained in 1924. But during the disastrous 2021 B.C. floods, part of the lake reflooded again, causing millions in damages.

    A team of researchers, led by the University of British Columbia along with members of the Sumas Nation, analyzed four flood response scenarios proposed by the City of Abbotsford. They concluded it could be cheaper to buy back some private land and reflood part of the former lake-bed — now known as Sumas Prairie — rather than build up the concrete infrastructure necessary to try to keep Semá:th Xhotsa dry forever. “We find that the cost of buying out properties in the lake-bed and allowing the lake to return is close to half the cost ($1 billion) of maintaining the status quo ($2.4 billion),” the authors conclude in the newly-published paper.

    The Semá:th People relied on the lake before it was drained and the Sumas Nation supports further research into flooding part of the lake to support the restoration of the ecosystem and mitigate disasters. But the city made it clear that managed retreat is not an option it’s planning to consider.

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  • www.nelsonstar.com B.C. Conservatives control right, need urban votes for that to matter: analysts

    Party in ‘pole position’ to take on NDP, but will their message resonate in vote-rich urban areas

    B.C. Conservatives control right, need urban votes for that to matter: analysts

    Political scientists see the Conservative Party of B.C. in the driver-seat when it comes to challenging the B.C. NDP, but it is not clear whether the provincial Tories will make in-roads in vote-rich urban B.C.

    Dennis Pilon, Chair in the Department of Politics at York University, who previously taught at the University of Victoria, said the current split on the right side of the political spectrum is nothing new.

    First the Socreds, then the B.C. Liberals, represented coalitions of more socially liberal urban voters and socially conservative rural voters, who found common ground in being pro-enterprise, fiscally conservative and anti-NDP, Pilon said.

    Tensions have always defined these coalitions and the provincial Conservatives are currently benefiting from increased polarization and the strength of the federal Conservatives, he added. But this rise is not happening evenly across the province. Polls show the provincial Conservatives behind the NDP in Metro Vancouver and Greater Victoria.

    “They (Conservatives) are looking like they are in the pole position to see voters come to them as a party that can beat the NDP, but it is not clear that urban right-wingers will be prepared to sign on to the Conservatives,” Pilon said.

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  • Officer Involved in Myles Gray’s Violent Death Now Works in a High School

    thetyee.ca Officer Involved in Myles Gray’s Violent Death Now Works in a High School | The Tyee

    Vancouver police won’t say whether Const. Hardeep Sahota is still facing disciplinary actions connected to the 2015 homicide.

    Officer Involved in Myles Gray’s Violent Death Now Works in a High School | The Tyee

    A Vancouver police officer who could be facing a disciplinary hearing following the violent 2015 death of Myles Gray is now working as a school liaison officer at a Vancouver secondary school.

    That’s a worry for some parents at John Oliver Secondary whose concerns were shared with police and the school district last fall.

    The Vancouver District Parent Advisory Council emailed police and the school district on behalf of the school’s parents in September, saying officers who have “participated in the death of a suspect” should not be working in schools.

    Four months after Vancouver Police Department officers returned to schools last September under the re-established school liaison officer program, The Tyee filed a freedom of information request for the names and school assignments of the 17 officers and one youth justice co-ordinator in the program.

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  • B.C. project aims to reduce kidney rejection - About half of all transplants fail over time due to rejection, says the project's leader

    >"A made-in-B.C. solution to improve organ-matching could revolutionize outcomes for kidney transplant recipients," read the agency's description of the project.

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  • May home sales in Vancouver area fall nearly 20%

    The Vancouver area's real estate board says the number of homes that changed hands in May fell 19.9 per cent compared to the same month last year as more new properties continued to hit the market.

    Greater Vancouver Realtors said Tuesday there were 2,733 home sales in the region last month, down from 3,411 sales recorded in May 2023 and 19.6 per cent below the 10-year seasonal average for May.

    That came as the number of homes listed for sale in the region in May rose 46.3 per cent from May 2023 to 13,600, which is nearly one-fifth higher than the 10-year seasonal average. In May, there were 6,374 detached, attached and apartment properties listed as newly available — a 12.6 per cent increase compared with May 2023.

    Andrew Lis, Greater Vancouver Realtors' director of economics and data analytics, called it a "surprise" that May sales came in softer than usual.

    "It's a natural inclination to chalk these trends up to one factor or another, but what we're seeing is a culmination of factors influencing buyer and seller decisions in the market right now," he said in a news release.

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  • Company misses deadline to remove illegal waste near Cultus Lake

    A company has missed its deadline to remove thousands of tons of illegally dumped waste from a farm near Cultus Lake in B.C.'s Columbia Valley.

    The waste on a property on Iverson Road near the lake, about 100 kilometres east of Vancouver, was originally dropped off at the site over the course of several months in 2022 without provincial approval, violating B.C.'s Environmental Management Act.

    The waste — which contains large amounts of plastics, wood and other foreign materials that made it unsuitable for composting — was discharged by the Abbotsford-based organic waste conversion company Fraser Valley Renewables (FVR).

    The company was ordered by the provincial Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) to remediate more than 14,000 tons of material by May 31.

    However, the ALC says that the company has not done so, and is now in violation of the order.

    The commission — which regulates all land that is part of the provincial agricultural land reserve — told CBC News in an email that it is considering further enforcement measures, including an administrative penalty or a court order to ensure compliance.

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  • B.C. company faces heavy fine for illegal cannabis distribution

    > The unnamed company was suspected of selling and distributing illegal cannabis from their Surrey headquarters, with additional properties located in Maple Ridge and Mission as well.

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  • www.nelsonstar.com Kootenay Lake shoreline ‘degraded’ by 4.5 km in 10 years

    Kootenay Lake Partnership is proposing a 5-year strategic plan

    Kootenay Lake shoreline ‘degraded’ by 4.5 km in 10 years

    Even as Kootenay Lake’s shoreline continues to be “degraded” a new strategic plan is being developed to slow and eventually halt illegal development on main body of water in the area.

    A five-year strategic plan is being proposed for development by the Kootenay Lake Partnership (KLP) — with a proposal for support from the City of Nelson for $2,000 for development — to join with the Regional District of Central Kootenay to draft a plan.

    A shoreline inventory was conducted in 2011 and, 10 years later, it was conducted again, uncovering a total of 4.5 kilometres of shoreline having been degraded in that time, said KLP co-ordinator Claire Peyton.

    “So, even with the shoreline guidance document in place, we are still experiencing rapid shoreline loss, so that is why we have been working hard to … set in place this regional environmental development permit area,” she said.

    The permit area would be 30 metres wide and run around the entire length of the lake.

    “(We) wouldn’t be able to say no to development, but we would have a little more control on what happens where,” she said.

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  • www.pqbnews.com BC United MLA crosses floor to join Conservative Party of BC

    ‘Our province and its people are worse off today than they were just 7 years ago’: Sturko

    BC United MLA crosses floor to join Conservative Party of BC

    > “On the biggest issues, including affordable housing, cancelling decriminalization of deadly drugs, fixing our broken health-care system, making our streets safe, and putting our natural resources to work growing jobs and our economy, the Conservatives make sense as that new coalition,” said Sturko.

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  • Does a BC Break for Landlords Go Too Far?

    thetyee.ca Does a BC Break for Landlords Go Too Far? | The Tyee

    Owners can apply for special rent increases to cover repairs. Tenants say the process is unfair.

    Does a BC Break for Landlords Go Too Far? | The Tyee

    Fighting a rent increase for herself and neighbours through B.C.’s Residential Tenancy Branch has taken Nanaimo tenant and housing activist Dianne Varga years of effort, generated a pile of paper and, in her view, achieved nothing.

    “I feel like tenants have been asked to do a dance with the RTB,” she said. “As lead tenant I’ve followed all the dance steps for two years, but it hasn’t mattered one iota.”

    Such disputes have become common since the B.C. government introduced a policy five years ago allowing landlords to apply for extra rent increases to cover the costs of repairs or renovations.

    For eligible work, landlords can raise rents by up to three per cent each year for three years. The increases are on top of other increases allowed under B.C.’s rent controls and are permanent, continuing after the repairs are paid for.

    At the four-storey Sand Dollar Manor where Varga lives, the question is whether the $73,000 cost of a new elevator should be paid for by tenants of the 73 units or by the building’s owner. Built in 1973, the apartment block at 450 Stewart Ave. near Nanaimo’s harbour is typical of its era, similar in style and age to many in communities throughout the province.

    The Residential Tenancy Branch has decided in the owner’s favour twice. The second ruling, in March, was necessary because the B.C. Supreme Court sent the initial decision back to the RTB for reconsideration after finding the branch’s process had been “manifestly unfair” to tenants the first time around due to “the lack of disclosure to the petitioners of evidence that was of direct relevance to material and critical aspects of the decision.”

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  • Dive Into Award-Winning Films for Indigenous History Month

    thetyee.ca Dive Into Award-Winning Films for Indigenous History Month | The Tyee

    Local movies from Haida Gwaii to Siksika Nation are streaming across the Knowledge Network this June. A sneak peak.

    Dive Into Award-Winning Films for Indigenous History Month | The Tyee

    Throughout June, Knowledge Network is broadcasting and streaming a specially curated selection of films by leading Indigenous filmmakers from B.C. and other parts of Canada.

    This special National Indigenous History Month selection includes two groundbreaking feature films shot in B.C. Directed by Helen Haig-Brown and Gwaai Edenshaw, SGaawaay K’uuna made history as the first feature film shot entirely in the Haida language. This film tells a classic Haida tale of a man who spirals into madness and transforms into Gaagiixiid — “the Wildman.”

    Shot in East Vancouver in almost one continuous take, The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open is an intimate exploration of Indigenous motherhood through the story of a chance encounter between two women from very different backgrounds. Directed by Elle Máijá Tailfeathers and Kathleen Hepburn, this critically acclaimed feature won the Vancouver Film Critics Circle award for Best Canadian Film in 2020.

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  • killercopscanada.wordpress.com RCMP Shoot and Kill Man in Mackenzie, British Columbia (June 1, 2024)

    RCMP shot and killed a man in Mackenzie, British Columbia, on June 1, 2024. The Independent Investigations Office (IIO) of BC reports that at around 2:00 PM, police responded to a call regarding a …

    RCMP Shoot and Kill Man in Mackenzie, British Columbia (June 1, 2024)
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  • The little fern that could move a mine

    thenarwhal.ca A little fern battles a big B.C. mine | The Narwhal

    Environmental groups are asking Canada for an emergency order to protect a threatened fern in Rossland, B.C., from a critical mineral project

    A little fern battles a big B.C. mine | The Narwhal

    In the grasslands of Record Ridge near Rossland, B.C., the little mountain holly fern is gearing up for the fight of its life. The rare plant is found in just two or three other places in Canada, and favours taking root in the cracks of magnesium-rich rock. But it’s not the only one lured by the critical mineral.

    West High Yield Resources wants to build an open-pit mine on the ridge, stripping the surface to extract magnesium and other minerals. The company’s exploration and mining footprint stretches across an area bigger than 22 Stanley Parks — 8,972 hectares. The project is deep into the permitting process and the application is now up for public comment.

    The company describes itself as “working to be at the forefront” of North America’s transition towards a low-carbon economy, with magnesium on the federal government’s list of minerals described as “critical” to electrification. West High Yield Resources declined to be interviewed or provide a comment for this story.

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  • Leaked Decision Slams LNG Ads for Greenwashing

    thetyee.ca Leaked Decision Slams LNG Ads for Greenwashing | The Tyee

    A regulating body found claims were misleading, but won’t be making its final ruling public.

    Leaked Decision Slams LNG Ads for Greenwashing | The Tyee

    After an interim decision was leaked earlier this week, Ad Standards Canada says it will not make public the final outcome of its investigation into allegations of greenwashing against oil and gas advocacy group Canada Action Coalition.

    The interim decision, which is dated Jan. 30 but was released to the complainants and Canada Action Coalition only earlier this month, unanimously found that Canada Action Coalition gave an “overall misleading impression that B.C. LNG is good for the environment, amounting to greenwashing.”

    In a statement, Canada Action Coalition said it is appealing the decision.

    But the outcome of that appeal will not be released to the public, Ad Standards said.

    “Due to egregious violations of confidentiality in this case, by the leaking of this decision which was not final, we will only be advising the advertiser of the outcome of the appeal,” president and CEO Catherine Bate wrote in a statement. “We will not be able to report the results of that decision publicly, or to comment further.” The Tyee is supported by readers like you Join us and grow independent media in Canada

    That move isn’t sitting well with those calling for action on greenwashing by the oil and gas industry.

    Leah Temper, health and economic policy program director with the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, or CAPE, said Ad Standards’ decision to withhold its findings in the current case “further undermines their credibility.”

    “If ads are being found to be false and misleading, what is the mechanism for correcting the public record?” Temper said. “We’re in these key critical moments and policymakers and the public are being swayed by these ads.”

    Temper added that the only way the public is likely to know the outcome of the appeal and the council’s final decision is if the ads continue to run.

    While CAPE released the interim decision on its website, it didn’t make the complaint. Temper said the issue was raised by “multiple complainants,” who remain anonymous.

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  • Mapping the Growth of Indigenous Marine Protected and Conserved Areas

    thetyee.ca Mapping the Growth of Indigenous Marine Protected and Conserved Areas | The Tyee

    First Nations are managing their coastal territories in response to colonization. A Tyee list of stories from 10 news outlets explains how.

    Mapping the Growth of Indigenous Marine Protected and Conserved Areas | The Tyee

    For time immemorial, Indigenous Peoples have stewarded what’s now called “Canada,” living off of and caring for its lands and waters. When settlers arrived, they introduced commercial fishing, shipping and industrialization, which have come to endanger the aquatic ecosystems critical to our survival.

    Now, Indigenous-led conservation areas are being established across the country to combat the impact colonization has had on oceans, lakes and rivers, and return these critical habitats to their original caretakers. While some First Nations are declaring these marine conservation areas in partnership with the federal government — there are five such Marine Conservation Areas so far — other First Nations are forging ahead on their own while they await settlers’ bureaucratic processes to catch up.

    These efforts can support jobs, conserve and restore aquatic habitats, and increase food security, as the reporting gathered here documents.

    This collection of stories produced by 10 news outlets, which can be used as an educational tool, is organized by water bodies. By clicking on the area you’d like to explore, you’ll be taken to the stories that detail the Indigenous-led conservation work being done to protect waters in that region. Clicking on a story headline will take you to the site of its original publication.

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  • www.nelsonstar.com New website, survey aimed at creating Filipino cultural centre in B.C.

    Filipinos have a long history in B.C., dating back to the 1880s on Bowen Island

    New website, survey aimed at creating Filipino cultural centre in B.C.

    The province has started an engagement process aimed at creating a Filipino cultural centre in B.C.

    A new website an survey is meant to give British Columbians opportunities to share their vision for a centre dedicated to celebrating Filipino Canadians’ heritage and contributions to B.C.’s success. The Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport Ministry says the development of the website and survey follows multiple roundtables with community organization leaders.

    “The contributions of the Filipino Canadian community in B.C. are an important part of our province’s history, culture and success,” Minister of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport Lana Popham said.

    The province says Filipinos have a long history in B.C., dating back to the 1880s on Bowen Island.

    Currently, more than 170,000 Filipinos call B.C. home and that population is expected to more than double by 2041.

    Filipino Canadians are the fourth-largest visible minority group in Canada, and third-largest in B.C.

    “Establishing a Filipino cultural centre has been a passion of mine ever since I was first elected and I am thrilled to see it move closer to being a reality,” Parliamentary Secretary for Anti-Racism Initiatives Mabel Elmore said.

    Feedback from the survey is expected to be released in a report in spring 2025, and then next steps will be taken to create a cultural centre.

    The survey can be found at engage.gov.bc.ca/provincialfilipinoculturalcentre.

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